The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Flexible working schedules in SMEs: Evidence from a developing country

Flexible working schedules in SMEs: Evidence from a developing country
Flexible working schedules in SMEs: Evidence from a developing country
There has been a sustained interest in flexible work schedules (FWSs) because of the opportunities they offer in improving organizational efficiency and providing a more work–life balanced role for employees. Yet, less research attention has been focused on FWSs in SMEs in developing countries, which leaves much to be concerned about FWSs, its application and impacts in SMEs in developing countries especially in the context of Africa. Drawing on the theory of work adjustment and job demand-resource model and using a survey data on SMEs from Ghana, the study theorizes and tests the relationship between FWSs and SMEs perceived profitability, employees' career satisfaction and productivity. The results from the analysis indicate that FWSs in SMEs in developing countries are positively associated with (perceived) profitability, employees' career satisfaction and productivity. The implications of these findings are discussed.
640–647
Peprah, Augustine Awuah
bae898c9-95d3-4010-966a-f06785f645fb
Agyemang, Collins Badu
de27094f-2201-46df-bd65-0f93e4630512
Damoah, Obi Berko Obeng
3ba6106b-e720-4875-a4cd-c7332156138c
Peprah, Augustine Awuah
bae898c9-95d3-4010-966a-f06785f645fb
Agyemang, Collins Badu
de27094f-2201-46df-bd65-0f93e4630512
Damoah, Obi Berko Obeng
3ba6106b-e720-4875-a4cd-c7332156138c

Peprah, Augustine Awuah, Agyemang, Collins Badu and Damoah, Obi Berko Obeng (2020) Flexible working schedules in SMEs: Evidence from a developing country. Business Strategy and Development, 3 (4), 640–647. (doi:10.1002/bsd2.128).

Record type: Article

Abstract

There has been a sustained interest in flexible work schedules (FWSs) because of the opportunities they offer in improving organizational efficiency and providing a more work–life balanced role for employees. Yet, less research attention has been focused on FWSs in SMEs in developing countries, which leaves much to be concerned about FWSs, its application and impacts in SMEs in developing countries especially in the context of Africa. Drawing on the theory of work adjustment and job demand-resource model and using a survey data on SMEs from Ghana, the study theorizes and tests the relationship between FWSs and SMEs perceived profitability, employees' career satisfaction and productivity. The results from the analysis indicate that FWSs in SMEs in developing countries are positively associated with (perceived) profitability, employees' career satisfaction and productivity. The implications of these findings are discussed.

Text
Flexible working schedules in SMEs Evidence from a developing country (002) - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 8 July 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 7 August 2020
Published date: 1 December 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 471160
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/471160
PURE UUID: 1ccc93fc-a22c-446d-802e-a28319159848
ORCID for Augustine Awuah Peprah: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6497-9161

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Oct 2022 16:41
Last modified: 30 Oct 2023 03:32

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Augustine Awuah Peprah ORCID iD
Author: Collins Badu Agyemang
Author: Obi Berko Obeng Damoah

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×