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COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy and confidence in the Philippines and Malaysia: A cross-sectional study of sociodemographic factors and digital health literacy

COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy and confidence in the Philippines and Malaysia: A cross-sectional study of sociodemographic factors and digital health literacy
COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy and confidence in the Philippines and Malaysia: A cross-sectional study of sociodemographic factors and digital health literacy
With the emergence of the highly transmissible Omicron variant, large-scale vaccination coverage is crucial to the national and global pandemic response, especially in populous Southeast Asian countries such as the Philippines and Malaysia where new information is often received digitally. The main aims of this research were to determine levels of hesitancy and confidence in COVID-19 vaccines among general adults in the Philippines and Malaysia, and to identify individual, behavioural, or environmental predictors significantly associated with these outcomes. Data from an internet-based cross-sectional survey of 2558 participants from the Philippines (N = 1002) and Malaysia (N = 1556) were analysed. Results showed that Filipino (56.6%) participants exhibited higher COVID-19 hesitancy than Malaysians (22.9%; p < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences in ratings of confidence between Filipino (45.9%) and Malaysian (49.2%) participants (p = 0.105). Predictors associated with vaccine hesitancy among Filipino participants included women (OR, 1.50, 95% CI, 1.03–1.83; p = 0.030) and rural dwellers (OR, 1.44, 95% CI, 1.07–1.94; p = 0.016). Among Malaysian participants, vaccine hesitancy was associated with women (OR, 1.50, 95% CI, 1.14–1.99; p = 0.004), social media use (OR, 11.76, 95% CI, 5.71–24.19; p < 0.001), and online information-seeking behaviours (OR, 2.48, 95% CI, 1.72–3.58; p < 0.001). Predictors associated with vaccine confidence among Filipino participants included subjective social status (OR, 1.13, 95% CI, 1.54–1.22; p < 0.001), whereas vaccine confidence among Malaysian participants was associated with higher education (OR, 1.30, 95% CI, 1.03–1.66; p < 0.028) and negatively associated with rural dwellers (OR, 0.64, 95% CI, 0.47–0.87; p = 0.005) and online information-seeking behaviours (OR, 0.42, 95% CI, 0.31–0.57; p < 0.001). Efforts should focus on creating effective interventions to decrease vaccination hesitancy, increase confidence, and bolster the uptake of COVID-19 vaccination, particularly in light of the Dengvaxia crisis in the Philippines.
2767-3375
Brackstone, Ken
33db3628-3171-4a7f-99cc-ad15db871fc5
Marzo, Roy Rillera
9252d595-62b7-4559-8291-a6d0e0bdaf6b
Bahari, Rafidah
385fde4c-6022-440b-91eb-ce39c299205f
Head, Michael
67ce0afc-2fc3-47f4-acf2-8794d27ce69c
Patalinghug, Mark
5ca1293d-018f-46a3-9859-d9eab6116c00
Su, Tin Tin
195768fb-9ef4-4be9-8d1c-62aa874c2b37
Brackstone, Ken
33db3628-3171-4a7f-99cc-ad15db871fc5
Marzo, Roy Rillera
9252d595-62b7-4559-8291-a6d0e0bdaf6b
Bahari, Rafidah
385fde4c-6022-440b-91eb-ce39c299205f
Head, Michael
67ce0afc-2fc3-47f4-acf2-8794d27ce69c
Patalinghug, Mark
5ca1293d-018f-46a3-9859-d9eab6116c00
Su, Tin Tin
195768fb-9ef4-4be9-8d1c-62aa874c2b37

Brackstone, Ken, Marzo, Roy Rillera, Bahari, Rafidah, Head, Michael, Patalinghug, Mark and Su, Tin Tin (2022) COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy and confidence in the Philippines and Malaysia: A cross-sectional study of sociodemographic factors and digital health literacy. PLOS Global Public Health. (doi:10.1371/journal.pgph.0000742).

Record type: Article

Abstract

With the emergence of the highly transmissible Omicron variant, large-scale vaccination coverage is crucial to the national and global pandemic response, especially in populous Southeast Asian countries such as the Philippines and Malaysia where new information is often received digitally. The main aims of this research were to determine levels of hesitancy and confidence in COVID-19 vaccines among general adults in the Philippines and Malaysia, and to identify individual, behavioural, or environmental predictors significantly associated with these outcomes. Data from an internet-based cross-sectional survey of 2558 participants from the Philippines (N = 1002) and Malaysia (N = 1556) were analysed. Results showed that Filipino (56.6%) participants exhibited higher COVID-19 hesitancy than Malaysians (22.9%; p < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences in ratings of confidence between Filipino (45.9%) and Malaysian (49.2%) participants (p = 0.105). Predictors associated with vaccine hesitancy among Filipino participants included women (OR, 1.50, 95% CI, 1.03–1.83; p = 0.030) and rural dwellers (OR, 1.44, 95% CI, 1.07–1.94; p = 0.016). Among Malaysian participants, vaccine hesitancy was associated with women (OR, 1.50, 95% CI, 1.14–1.99; p = 0.004), social media use (OR, 11.76, 95% CI, 5.71–24.19; p < 0.001), and online information-seeking behaviours (OR, 2.48, 95% CI, 1.72–3.58; p < 0.001). Predictors associated with vaccine confidence among Filipino participants included subjective social status (OR, 1.13, 95% CI, 1.54–1.22; p < 0.001), whereas vaccine confidence among Malaysian participants was associated with higher education (OR, 1.30, 95% CI, 1.03–1.66; p < 0.028) and negatively associated with rural dwellers (OR, 0.64, 95% CI, 0.47–0.87; p = 0.005) and online information-seeking behaviours (OR, 0.42, 95% CI, 0.31–0.57; p < 0.001). Efforts should focus on creating effective interventions to decrease vaccination hesitancy, increase confidence, and bolster the uptake of COVID-19 vaccination, particularly in light of the Dengvaxia crisis in the Philippines.

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Accepted/In Press date: 20 September 2022
Published date: 19 October 2022

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 471491
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/471491
ISSN: 2767-3375
PURE UUID: 159751e9-97c2-453e-8a61-9af81848537f
ORCID for Michael Head: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1189-0531

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Date deposited: 09 Nov 2022 17:57
Last modified: 10 Nov 2022 02:44

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Contributors

Author: Ken Brackstone
Author: Roy Rillera Marzo
Author: Rafidah Bahari
Author: Michael Head ORCID iD
Author: Mark Patalinghug
Author: Tin Tin Su

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