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Social familiarity improves fast-start escape performance in schooling fish

Social familiarity improves fast-start escape performance in schooling fish
Social familiarity improves fast-start escape performance in schooling fish
Using social groups (i.e. schools) of the tropical damselfish Chromis viridis, we test how familiarity through repeated social interactions influences fast-start responses, the primary defensive behaviour in a range of taxa, including fish, sharks, and larval amphibians. We focus on reactivity through response latency and kinematic performance (i.e. agility and propulsion) following a simulated predator attack, while distinguishing between first and subsequent responders (direct response to stimulation versus response triggered by integrated direct and social stimulation, respectively). In familiar schools, first and subsequent responders exhibit shorter latency than unfamiliar individuals, demonstrating that familiarity increases reactivity to direct and, potentially, social stimulation. Further, familiarity modulates kinematic performance in subsequent responders, demonstrated by increased agility and propulsion. These findings demonstrate that the benefits of social recognition and memory may enhance individual fitness through greater survival of predator attacks.
2399-3642
Nadler, Lauren E.
1d1f8e6a-e951-41f5-888c-cfcb4b4b19dc
McCormick, Mark I.
18c6b112-782f-443c-b4f5-fda311b3d344
Johansen, Jacob L.
48aa2c7d-5ed0-4f10-af6f-39032ca1f70d
Domenici, Paolo
1a8cf671-af80-46f3-a2e3-4fa963a9f297
Nadler, Lauren E.
1d1f8e6a-e951-41f5-888c-cfcb4b4b19dc
McCormick, Mark I.
18c6b112-782f-443c-b4f5-fda311b3d344
Johansen, Jacob L.
48aa2c7d-5ed0-4f10-af6f-39032ca1f70d
Domenici, Paolo
1a8cf671-af80-46f3-a2e3-4fa963a9f297

Nadler, Lauren E., McCormick, Mark I., Johansen, Jacob L. and Domenici, Paolo (2021) Social familiarity improves fast-start escape performance in schooling fish. Communications Biology, 4, [897]. (doi:10.1038/s42003-021-02407-4).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Using social groups (i.e. schools) of the tropical damselfish Chromis viridis, we test how familiarity through repeated social interactions influences fast-start responses, the primary defensive behaviour in a range of taxa, including fish, sharks, and larval amphibians. We focus on reactivity through response latency and kinematic performance (i.e. agility and propulsion) following a simulated predator attack, while distinguishing between first and subsequent responders (direct response to stimulation versus response triggered by integrated direct and social stimulation, respectively). In familiar schools, first and subsequent responders exhibit shorter latency than unfamiliar individuals, demonstrating that familiarity increases reactivity to direct and, potentially, social stimulation. Further, familiarity modulates kinematic performance in subsequent responders, demonstrated by increased agility and propulsion. These findings demonstrate that the benefits of social recognition and memory may enhance individual fitness through greater survival of predator attacks.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 20 July 2021

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 471654
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/471654
ISSN: 2399-3642
PURE UUID: 454775de-17f5-4edf-a90a-5641440d2240
ORCID for Lauren E. Nadler: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8225-8344

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Date deposited: 15 Nov 2022 18:09
Last modified: 25 Feb 2023 03:06

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Contributors

Author: Lauren E. Nadler ORCID iD
Author: Mark I. McCormick
Author: Jacob L. Johansen
Author: Paolo Domenici

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