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Validity and reliability of sensor system to measure trunk range of motion during Streamlined Wolf Motor Function Test in chronic stroke and aged-matched healthy participants

Validity and reliability of sensor system to measure trunk range of motion during Streamlined Wolf Motor Function Test in chronic stroke and aged-matched healthy participants
Validity and reliability of sensor system to measure trunk range of motion during Streamlined Wolf Motor Function Test in chronic stroke and aged-matched healthy participants

Objective: To investigate the validity and reliability of using the Valedo® system to measure trunk Range of Motion (ROM) during performance of the streamlined Wolf Motor Function Test (SWMFT). 

Methods: Twenty chronic strokes and 20 age-matched healthy participants performed SWMFT while wearing Valedo® sensors on their trunks to capture trunk movements. A paired sample T-test was used to examine the validity of the system in distinguishing between the healthy and stroke group, and between the affected and unaffected sides in the stroke group. Interclass correlation coefficients were used to assess the inter-rater and intra-rater reliability (between-days) with 95% CI. 

Results: The Valedo® system was able to distinguish between stroke and healthy participants; stroke participants employed greater trunk range of movements than the healthy controls in all tasks (p < .01). Furthermore, the Valedo® system enabled differentiation between affected and unaffected hands of people within the stroke group. The reliability for the stroke group was good to excellent with intrarater reliability (ICC = 0.71–0.92) and interrater reliability (ICC = 0.63–0.95). 

Conclusions: The Valedo system demonstrates an acceptable level of validity and reliability for measuring trunk ROM during the Streamlined Wolf Motor Function Test (SWMFT). Future studies with a larger sample size, different levels of upper limb impairment are warranted.

Objective assessment, inertial sensor, reliability, stroke, trunk impairment, upper limb impairment, validity
1074-9357
1-13
Alhwoaimel, Norah
2bbf3fd2-1b5b-4f87-b357-47a182893249
Warner, Martin B.
0d9ce533-67ba-4b3f-b798-53ab1a4f4ca7
Hughes, Ann-Marie
11239f51-de47-4445-9a0d-5b82ddc11dea
Busselli, Giulia
d771498e-b8a6-4e05-b556-b5097b56d5de
Turk, Ruth
985d334a-d337-48a6-a112-0665b82d78aa
Alhwoaimel, Norah
2bbf3fd2-1b5b-4f87-b357-47a182893249
Warner, Martin B.
0d9ce533-67ba-4b3f-b798-53ab1a4f4ca7
Hughes, Ann-Marie
11239f51-de47-4445-9a0d-5b82ddc11dea
Busselli, Giulia
d771498e-b8a6-4e05-b556-b5097b56d5de
Turk, Ruth
985d334a-d337-48a6-a112-0665b82d78aa

Alhwoaimel, Norah, Warner, Martin B., Hughes, Ann-Marie, Busselli, Giulia and Turk, Ruth (2022) Validity and reliability of sensor system to measure trunk range of motion during Streamlined Wolf Motor Function Test in chronic stroke and aged-matched healthy participants. Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, 1-13. (doi:10.1080/10749357.2022.2127665).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the validity and reliability of using the Valedo® system to measure trunk Range of Motion (ROM) during performance of the streamlined Wolf Motor Function Test (SWMFT). 

Methods: Twenty chronic strokes and 20 age-matched healthy participants performed SWMFT while wearing Valedo® sensors on their trunks to capture trunk movements. A paired sample T-test was used to examine the validity of the system in distinguishing between the healthy and stroke group, and between the affected and unaffected sides in the stroke group. Interclass correlation coefficients were used to assess the inter-rater and intra-rater reliability (between-days) with 95% CI. 

Results: The Valedo® system was able to distinguish between stroke and healthy participants; stroke participants employed greater trunk range of movements than the healthy controls in all tasks (p < .01). Furthermore, the Valedo® system enabled differentiation between affected and unaffected hands of people within the stroke group. The reliability for the stroke group was good to excellent with intrarater reliability (ICC = 0.71–0.92) and interrater reliability (ICC = 0.63–0.95). 

Conclusions: The Valedo system demonstrates an acceptable level of validity and reliability for measuring trunk ROM during the Streamlined Wolf Motor Function Test (SWMFT). Future studies with a larger sample size, different levels of upper limb impairment are warranted.

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second study publication- Realibility - Accepted Manuscript
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Validity and reliability of sensor system to measure trunk range of motion during Streamlined Wolf Motor Function Test in chronic stroke and aged - Version of Record
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 18 September 2022
e-pub ahead of print date: 3 October 2022
Additional Information: Publisher Copyright: © 2022 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.
Keywords: Objective assessment, inertial sensor, reliability, stroke, trunk impairment, upper limb impairment, validity

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 471707
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/471707
ISSN: 1074-9357
PURE UUID: 5d92fc66-c978-4932-b529-181b0014a937
ORCID for Ann-Marie Hughes: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3958-8206

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Nov 2022 18:27
Last modified: 07 Jan 2023 02:41

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Contributors

Author: Norah Alhwoaimel
Author: Martin B. Warner
Author: Giulia Busselli
Author: Ruth Turk

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