The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

New media, the information bomb, and the overexposed city:: Paul Virilio contra Bernard Stiegler on technology, space, and time

New media, the information bomb, and the overexposed city:: Paul Virilio contra Bernard Stiegler on technology, space, and time
New media, the information bomb, and the overexposed city:: Paul Virilio contra Bernard Stiegler on technology, space, and time
New media, defined by the internet and other postindustrial forms of telecommunication, is one of the best-known and most wide-ranging contemporary cultural and critical concepts. This article provides an accessible introduction to the French critic of the art of technology Paul Virilio’s writings on the new media of what Virilio calls ‘the information bomb’ and ‘the overexposed city’. Steering the reader through this crucial thinker’s often challenging work, the article considers Virilio’s ongoing impact on present-day critical new media theory by contrasting it with that of the French philosopher Bernard Stiegler. With extensive discussion of Virilio’s and Stiegler’s very different technological and spatial viewpoints and careful appreciation for questions concerning contemporary temporality, the article guides the reader through part of the electronic labyrinth that is new media.
New media; information bomb; overexposed city; Paul Virilio; Bernard Stiegler; technology; space; time
Armitage, John
19639b0b-0399-4dc6-9369-4d8c1ed77480
Armitage, John
19639b0b-0399-4dc6-9369-4d8c1ed77480

Armitage, John (2022) New media, the information bomb, and the overexposed city:: Paul Virilio contra Bernard Stiegler on technology, space, and time. Media Theory, 6 (1).

Record type: Article

Abstract

New media, defined by the internet and other postindustrial forms of telecommunication, is one of the best-known and most wide-ranging contemporary cultural and critical concepts. This article provides an accessible introduction to the French critic of the art of technology Paul Virilio’s writings on the new media of what Virilio calls ‘the information bomb’ and ‘the overexposed city’. Steering the reader through this crucial thinker’s often challenging work, the article considers Virilio’s ongoing impact on present-day critical new media theory by contrasting it with that of the French philosopher Bernard Stiegler. With extensive discussion of Virilio’s and Stiegler’s very different technological and spatial viewpoints and careful appreciation for questions concerning contemporary temporality, the article guides the reader through part of the electronic labyrinth that is new media.

Text
Media Theory Article 2022 - Version of Record
Download (262kB)

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 17 November 2022
Additional Information: John Armitage is Visiting Professor of Media Arts at Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton, United Kingdom. He is the editor and author of numerous books on the work of Paul Virilio, including The Virilio Dictionary (Edinburgh University Press, 2013) and Virilio for Architects (Routledge, 2015).
Keywords: New media; information bomb; overexposed city; Paul Virilio; Bernard Stiegler; technology; space; time

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 472113
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/472113
PURE UUID: d2f475f3-f10b-445f-9554-d71a80a00b04
ORCID for John Armitage: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5533-197X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Nov 2022 17:56
Last modified: 26 Nov 2022 02:46

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×