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Learning about the changing needs for prosthetics service provision from routinely collected digital centre management data: an exemplar study across three clinics in Cambodia

Learning about the changing needs for prosthetics service provision from routinely collected digital centre management data: an exemplar study across three clinics in Cambodia
Learning about the changing needs for prosthetics service provision from routinely collected digital centre management data: an exemplar study across three clinics in Cambodia

Background: Prosthetic service development and delivery rely on data describing population needs. These needs are context-specific, but most existing data come from high-income countries or small geographic areas, which are often not comparable. This study analysed routinely collected digital patient record data at multiple time points to provide insights into characteristics of people accessing Cambodian prosthetic services. Methods: We investigated trends in birth year, sex, year and reason for limb absence, and prosthesis type, over three decades. Then, we observed data from 2005 and 2019 indicating how the population actively accessing prosthetics services has changed. Results: Temporal trends in prosthetics service user demographics corresponded with events in Cambodia's socio-political history. The predominant historical reason for limb absence prior to 2000 was weapon trauma during and following conflict. Since 2000, this was replaced by non-communicable disease and road accidents. Transtibial remained the most prevalent amputation level but transfemoral amputation had higher incidence for people with limb loss from road accidents, and people with limb loss due to disease were older. These observations are important as both transfemoral and older-aged groups experience particular rehabilitation challenges compared to the young, transtibial group. Conclusions: The study shows how standardised, routinely collected data across multiple clinics within a country can be used to characterise prosthetics service user populations and shows significant changes over time. This indicates the need to track client characteristics and provides evidence for adapting services according to population dynamics and changes in patient need.

2047-2986
4083
Dickinson, Alexander
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Gates, Lucy
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Metcalf, Cheryl
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Owen, Charlotte
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Kheng, Sisary
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Harte, Carson
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Sam, Bunthoeun
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Simpson, Sam
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Worsley, Peter
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Ostler, Chantel, Marie
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Donovan-Hall, Maggie
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Channon, Andrew Amos
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Dickinson, Alexander
10151972-c1b5-4f7d-bc12-6482b5870cad
Gates, Lucy
bc67b8b8-110b-4358-8e1b-6f1d345bd503
Metcalf, Cheryl
09a47264-8bd5-43bd-a93e-177992c22c72
Owen, Charlotte
9ec647b5-2b91-4469-8a97-4777759ec164
Kheng, Sisary
7cc2578a-530b-4cdf-b143-c19cf7d0bbf1
Harte, Carson
5758d515-8715-452f-949e-e0164de0dcbb
Sam, Bunthoeun
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Simpson, Sam
e1d59685-e99b-4222-8b09-9b5254c7c3c1
Worsley, Peter
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Ostler, Chantel, Marie
c5e34ffb-7763-4fc0-98a4-128d1ed5d967
Donovan-Hall, Maggie
5f138055-2162-4982-846c-5c92411055e0
Channon, Andrew Amos
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Dickinson, Alexander, Gates, Lucy, Metcalf, Cheryl, Owen, Charlotte, Kheng, Sisary, Harte, Carson, Sam, Bunthoeun, Simpson, Sam, Worsley, Peter, Ostler, Chantel, Marie, Donovan-Hall, Maggie and Channon, Andrew Amos (2022) Learning about the changing needs for prosthetics service provision from routinely collected digital centre management data: an exemplar study across three clinics in Cambodia. Journal of Global Health, 12, 4083. (doi:10.7189/jogh.12.04083).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Prosthetic service development and delivery rely on data describing population needs. These needs are context-specific, but most existing data come from high-income countries or small geographic areas, which are often not comparable. This study analysed routinely collected digital patient record data at multiple time points to provide insights into characteristics of people accessing Cambodian prosthetic services. Methods: We investigated trends in birth year, sex, year and reason for limb absence, and prosthesis type, over three decades. Then, we observed data from 2005 and 2019 indicating how the population actively accessing prosthetics services has changed. Results: Temporal trends in prosthetics service user demographics corresponded with events in Cambodia's socio-political history. The predominant historical reason for limb absence prior to 2000 was weapon trauma during and following conflict. Since 2000, this was replaced by non-communicable disease and road accidents. Transtibial remained the most prevalent amputation level but transfemoral amputation had higher incidence for people with limb loss from road accidents, and people with limb loss due to disease were older. These observations are important as both transfemoral and older-aged groups experience particular rehabilitation challenges compared to the young, transtibial group. Conclusions: The study shows how standardised, routinely collected data across multiple clinics within a country can be used to characterise prosthetics service user populations and shows significant changes over time. This indicates the need to track client characteristics and provides evidence for adapting services according to population dynamics and changes in patient need.

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Submitted date: 10 May 2022
Accepted/In Press date: 24 August 2022
Published date: 24 October 2022
Additional Information: Copyright © 2022 by the Journal of Global Health. All rights reserved.

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 472151
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/472151
ISSN: 2047-2986
PURE UUID: e0637e39-10b0-4cc9-83f9-94b82b69b49d
ORCID for Alexander Dickinson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9647-1944
ORCID for Lucy Gates: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8627-3418
ORCID for Cheryl Metcalf: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7404-6066
ORCID for Peter Worsley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0145-5042
ORCID for Andrew Amos Channon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4855-0418

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Date deposited: 28 Nov 2022 17:58
Last modified: 29 Nov 2022 02:42

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Contributors

Author: Lucy Gates ORCID iD
Author: Cheryl Metcalf ORCID iD
Author: Charlotte Owen
Author: Sisary Kheng
Author: Carson Harte
Author: Bunthoeun Sam
Author: Sam Simpson
Author: Peter Worsley ORCID iD
Author: Chantel, Marie Ostler

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