The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Homeostatic regulation of renewing tissue cell populations via crowding control

Homeostatic regulation of renewing tissue cell populations via crowding control
Homeostatic regulation of renewing tissue cell populations via crowding control
To maintain renewing epithelial tissues in a healthy, homeostatic state, (stem) cell divisions and differentiation need to be tightly regulated. Mechanisms of homeostatic control often rely on crowding control: cells are able to sense the cell density in their environment (via various molecular and mechanosensing pathways) and respond by adjusting division, differentiation, and cell state transitions appropriately. Here we determine, via a mathematically rigorous framework, which general conditions for the crowding feedback regulation (i) must be minimally met, and (ii) are sufficient, to allow the maintenance of homeostasis in renewing tissues. We show that those conditions naturally allow for a degree of robustness toward disruption of regulation. Furthermore, intrinsic to this feedback regulation is that stem cell identity is established collectively by the cell population, not by individual cells, which implies the possibility of `quasi-dedifferentiation', in which cells committed to differentiation may reacquire stem cell properties upon depletion of the stem cell pool. These findings can guide future experimental campaigns to identify specific crowding feedback mechanisms.
arXiv
Parigini, Cristina
e703096b-49c9-43e6-af7c-62a3a85e9a9b
Greulich, Philip
65da32ad-a73a-435a-86e0-e171437430a9
Parigini, Cristina
e703096b-49c9-43e6-af7c-62a3a85e9a9b
Greulich, Philip
65da32ad-a73a-435a-86e0-e171437430a9

[Unknown type: UNSPECIFIED]

Record type: UNSPECIFIED

Abstract

To maintain renewing epithelial tissues in a healthy, homeostatic state, (stem) cell divisions and differentiation need to be tightly regulated. Mechanisms of homeostatic control often rely on crowding control: cells are able to sense the cell density in their environment (via various molecular and mechanosensing pathways) and respond by adjusting division, differentiation, and cell state transitions appropriately. Here we determine, via a mathematically rigorous framework, which general conditions for the crowding feedback regulation (i) must be minimally met, and (ii) are sufficient, to allow the maintenance of homeostasis in renewing tissues. We show that those conditions naturally allow for a degree of robustness toward disruption of regulation. Furthermore, intrinsic to this feedback regulation is that stem cell identity is established collectively by the cell population, not by individual cells, which implies the possibility of `quasi-dedifferentiation', in which cells committed to differentiation may reacquire stem cell properties upon depletion of the stem cell pool. These findings can guide future experimental campaigns to identify specific crowding feedback mechanisms.

Text
Crowding-Feedback_arxiv2301.05321 - Author's Original
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (983kB)

More information

Submitted date: 12 January 2023
Published date: 12 January 2023

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 474413
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/474413
PURE UUID: 4f8d869b-df10-4939-b6a4-d5f6db81da22
ORCID for Philip Greulich: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5247-6738

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Feb 2023 17:52
Last modified: 17 Mar 2024 03:33

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Cristina Parigini
Author: Philip Greulich ORCID iD

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×