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Benefits of shared-fleet horizontal logistics collaborations: a case study of patient service vehicles collecting pathology samples in a public sector healthcare setting

Benefits of shared-fleet horizontal logistics collaborations: a case study of patient service vehicles collecting pathology samples in a public sector healthcare setting
Benefits of shared-fleet horizontal logistics collaborations: a case study of patient service vehicles collecting pathology samples in a public sector healthcare setting
Road-based logistics suffer from inefficiencies due to less-than-full load vehicle movements. Consolidating loads through shared-fleet collaborations (also known as freight pooling) can reduce such inefficiencies, and thereby reduce costs, vehicle-kilometres (vkm), and related emissions and congestion. Utilising a significant historical dataset of vehicle movements, the potential cost savings and environmental benefits of a shared-fleet operation involving collaboration between two public sector organisations, integrating both static (fixed-schedule) and dynamic (client-specific) demand within a healthcare setting, were quantified. A Sample Collection Service (SCS; transporting pathology samples from doctors’ surgeries to centralised laboratories for analysis) shared spare capacity in vehicles operated by a Patient Transport Service (PTS; transporting eligible non-emergency patients to/from routine hospital appointments) as an alternative to engaging an external courier company. Results suggested that a shared-fleet collaboration servicing 78 surgeries, alongside normal patient loads in an average of 24 PTS vehicles/day, produced reductions of 16%, 13% and 12% in costs, vkm and carbon dioxide emissions, respectively. Decision-makers within public sector organisations that operate own-account vehicle fleets could pursue policies that actively seek out opportunities to deploy shared-fleet solutions to improve vehicle utilisation and therefore reduce public sector spending and the detrimental effects of road logistics.
freight pooling, healthcare, horizontal collaboration, logistics, public sector, road vehicles, shared-fleet
2673-7590
169–188
Grote, Matt
f29566f9-42a7-498a-9671-8661a4287754
Cherrett, Thomas
e5929951-e97c-4720-96a8-3e586f2d5f95
Oakey, Andy
dfd6e317-1e6d-429c-a3e0-bc80e92787d1
Martinez-Sykora, Antonio
2f9989e1-7860-4163-996c-b1e6f21d5bed
Aydemir, Ismail
2fd6cf88-6fef-44bc-85f6-70b65743b490
Grote, Matt
f29566f9-42a7-498a-9671-8661a4287754
Cherrett, Thomas
e5929951-e97c-4720-96a8-3e586f2d5f95
Oakey, Andy
dfd6e317-1e6d-429c-a3e0-bc80e92787d1
Martinez-Sykora, Antonio
2f9989e1-7860-4163-996c-b1e6f21d5bed
Aydemir, Ismail
2fd6cf88-6fef-44bc-85f6-70b65743b490

Grote, Matt, Cherrett, Thomas, Oakey, Andy, Martinez-Sykora, Antonio and Aydemir, Ismail (2023) Benefits of shared-fleet horizontal logistics collaborations: a case study of patient service vehicles collecting pathology samples in a public sector healthcare setting. Future Transportation, 3 (1), 169–188. (doi:10.3390/futuretransp3010011).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Road-based logistics suffer from inefficiencies due to less-than-full load vehicle movements. Consolidating loads through shared-fleet collaborations (also known as freight pooling) can reduce such inefficiencies, and thereby reduce costs, vehicle-kilometres (vkm), and related emissions and congestion. Utilising a significant historical dataset of vehicle movements, the potential cost savings and environmental benefits of a shared-fleet operation involving collaboration between two public sector organisations, integrating both static (fixed-schedule) and dynamic (client-specific) demand within a healthcare setting, were quantified. A Sample Collection Service (SCS; transporting pathology samples from doctors’ surgeries to centralised laboratories for analysis) shared spare capacity in vehicles operated by a Patient Transport Service (PTS; transporting eligible non-emergency patients to/from routine hospital appointments) as an alternative to engaging an external courier company. Results suggested that a shared-fleet collaboration servicing 78 surgeries, alongside normal patient loads in an average of 24 PTS vehicles/day, produced reductions of 16%, 13% and 12% in costs, vkm and carbon dioxide emissions, respectively. Decision-makers within public sector organisations that operate own-account vehicle fleets could pursue policies that actively seek out opportunities to deploy shared-fleet solutions to improve vehicle utilisation and therefore reduce public sector spending and the detrimental effects of road logistics.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 30 January 2023
e-pub ahead of print date: 3 February 2023
Published date: 1 March 2023
Additional Information: Funding Information: This research was funded by the EPSRC, grant number EP/V002619/1; and by the UK Department for Transport under Solent Transport’s Future Transport Zones project. Publisher Copyright: © 2023 by the authors.
Keywords: freight pooling, healthcare, horizontal collaboration, logistics, public sector, road vehicles, shared-fleet

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 475107
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/475107
ISSN: 2673-7590
PURE UUID: 29470443-beac-4839-9f8e-72e915683e7f
ORCID for Matt Grote: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5590-7150
ORCID for Thomas Cherrett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0394-5459
ORCID for Andy Oakey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1796-5485
ORCID for Antonio Martinez-Sykora: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2435-3113
ORCID for Ismail Aydemir: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7847-1801

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Date deposited: 10 Mar 2023 17:31
Last modified: 20 Jul 2024 02:06

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Contributors

Author: Matt Grote ORCID iD
Author: Thomas Cherrett ORCID iD
Author: Andy Oakey ORCID iD
Author: Ismail Aydemir ORCID iD

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