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Modified chalcogenide glasses for optical device applications

Modified chalcogenide glasses for optical device applications
Modified chalcogenide glasses for optical device applications
This thesis focuses on two different, but complementary, aspects of the modification of gallium lanthanum sulphide (GLS) glasses. Firstly the addition of transition metal ions as dopants is examined and their potential for use as active optical materials is explored. It is also argued that the spectroscopic analysis of transition metal ions is a useful tool for evaluating the local environment of their host. Secondly femtosecond (fs) laser modification of GLS is investigated as a method for waveguide formation. Through optical characterisation of fs laser written waveguides in GLS, a formation mechanism has been proposed. Tunnelling has been identified as the dominant nonlinear absorption mechanism in the formation of the waveguides. Single mode guidance at 633 nm has been demonstrated. The writing parameters for the minimum propagation loss of 1.47 dB/cm are 0.36 µJ pulse energy and 50 µm/s scanning speed. The observation of spectral broadening in these waveguides indicates that they may have applications for nonlinear optical devices. Fs laser written waveguides in transition metal doped GLS could lead to broadband active optical devices.
Hughes, Mark A.
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Hughes, Mark A.
2306bfa8-7474-43ee-bf89-01bb035889bb
Hewak, Daniel
87c80070-c101-4f7a-914f-4cc3131e3db0
Curry, Richard J.
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Hughes, Mark A. (2007) Modified chalcogenide glasses for optical device applications. University of Southampton, Optoelectronic Research Centre, Doctoral Thesis, 243pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

This thesis focuses on two different, but complementary, aspects of the modification of gallium lanthanum sulphide (GLS) glasses. Firstly the addition of transition metal ions as dopants is examined and their potential for use as active optical materials is explored. It is also argued that the spectroscopic analysis of transition metal ions is a useful tool for evaluating the local environment of their host. Secondly femtosecond (fs) laser modification of GLS is investigated as a method for waveguide formation. Through optical characterisation of fs laser written waveguides in GLS, a formation mechanism has been proposed. Tunnelling has been identified as the dominant nonlinear absorption mechanism in the formation of the waveguides. Single mode guidance at 633 nm has been demonstrated. The writing parameters for the minimum propagation loss of 1.47 dB/cm are 0.36 µJ pulse energy and 50 µm/s scanning speed. The observation of spectral broadening in these waveguides indicates that they may have applications for nonlinear optical devices. Fs laser written waveguides in transition metal doped GLS could lead to broadband active optical devices.

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More information

Published date: May 2007
Organisations: University of Southampton, Optoelectronics Research Centre

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 47761
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/47761
PURE UUID: 20c808cc-7306-475f-a69c-a391c06aac49
ORCID for Daniel Hewak: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2093-5773

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Aug 2007
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:53

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