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Covid-19 and mental health: could visual art exposure help?

Covid-19 and mental health: could visual art exposure help?
Covid-19 and mental health: could visual art exposure help?

A worldwide mental health crisis is expected, as millions worldwide fear death and disease while being forced into repeated isolation. Thus, there is a need for new proactive approaches to improve mental resilience and prevent mental health conditions. Since the 1990s, art has emerged as an alternative mental health therapy in the United States and Europe, becoming part of the social care agenda. This article focuses on how visual aesthetic experiences can create similar patterns of neuronal activity as those observed when the reward system is activated. The activation of the reward structures could have a stress buffering effect, given the interdependence observed between the reward and stress systems. Therefore, could visual esthetic experiences stimulate mental resilience? And if this were the case, could art-based interventions be offered for mental health in the context of COVID-19 and beyond?

art, fMRI, mental resilience, neuroesthetics, reward pathways
1664-1078
Gallo, Laura M.H.
8d5c93f9-764e-430b-ac63-71945596247a
Giampietro, Vincent
68b34334-841f-4fa5-bf5e-29929bc21306
Zunszain, Patricia A.
d85e7414-a7e7-4b8f-9e2d-0ece90a88018
Tan, Kai Syng
ac184aa0-8e5b-4802-a725-80daa6231c86
Gallo, Laura M.H.
8d5c93f9-764e-430b-ac63-71945596247a
Giampietro, Vincent
68b34334-841f-4fa5-bf5e-29929bc21306
Zunszain, Patricia A.
d85e7414-a7e7-4b8f-9e2d-0ece90a88018
Tan, Kai Syng
ac184aa0-8e5b-4802-a725-80daa6231c86

Gallo, Laura M.H., Giampietro, Vincent, Zunszain, Patricia A. and Tan, Kai Syng (2021) Covid-19 and mental health: could visual art exposure help? Frontiers in Psychology, 12, [650314]. (doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2021.650314).

Record type: Article

Abstract

A worldwide mental health crisis is expected, as millions worldwide fear death and disease while being forced into repeated isolation. Thus, there is a need for new proactive approaches to improve mental resilience and prevent mental health conditions. Since the 1990s, art has emerged as an alternative mental health therapy in the United States and Europe, becoming part of the social care agenda. This article focuses on how visual aesthetic experiences can create similar patterns of neuronal activity as those observed when the reward system is activated. The activation of the reward structures could have a stress buffering effect, given the interdependence observed between the reward and stress systems. Therefore, could visual esthetic experiences stimulate mental resilience? And if this were the case, could art-based interventions be offered for mental health in the context of COVID-19 and beyond?

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fpsyg-12-650314 - Version of Record
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Accepted/In Press date: 1 April 2021
Published date: 30 April 2021
Keywords: art, fMRI, mental resilience, neuroesthetics, reward pathways

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 479479
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/479479
ISSN: 1664-1078
PURE UUID: b553e00f-1a62-4ecf-a01a-d95a38fbdee9
ORCID for Kai Syng Tan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4491-7166

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Jul 2023 16:35
Last modified: 31 Oct 2023 03:16

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Contributors

Author: Laura M.H. Gallo
Author: Vincent Giampietro
Author: Patricia A. Zunszain
Author: Kai Syng Tan ORCID iD

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