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The late Roman and early Islamic urban enceinte

Record type: Article

It has been established in the preceding sections that settlement walls were by no means uncommon in ancient Egypt, and it is from this tradition that the late Roman and early Islamic urban configuration developed. With the incorporation of the country into the Roman empire, it was inevitable that changes would be made to its defensive situation, and the continuing Hellenization of the upper classes would alter perceptions of the urban ideal. This section will consider to what extent these forces brought Egypt into line with other eastern Roman provinces, and how the urban enceinte developed after the Arab conquest of the country in 642.

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Citation

Gascoigne, Alison L. (2004) The late Roman and early Islamic urban enceinte Cambridge Archaeological Journal, 14, (2), pp. 276-284. (doi:10.1017/S0959774304250168).

More information

Published date: October 2004
Keywords: city walls, egyptian walls, ancient urban walling, defence, ancient urban

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 48253
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/48253
ISSN: 0959-7743
PURE UUID: ab6238b6-961d-4cd3-b4e4-ab7d143b6a02

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 Sep 2007
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 15:00

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