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Visualizing multi-hectare seafloor habitats with BioCam

Visualizing multi-hectare seafloor habitats with BioCam
Visualizing multi-hectare seafloor habitats with BioCam
Range or resolution? We often get asked this question when mapping the seafloor. And it is important because the type of data we choose to collect fundamentally changes the science that can follow. Photos taken by camera-equipped autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) represent one extreme of the range/resolution trade-off, where sub-centimeter resolutions can be achieved, but typically only from close ranges of 2 m to 3 m. Taking images from higher altitudes increases the area mapped during visual surveys in two ways. First, a larger footprint can be observed in each image, and second, the lower risk of collision with rugged terrains when operating at higher altitudes allows use of flight-style AUVs (e.g., Autosub6000 shown in Figure 1), which are faster and more energy efficient than the hover-capable vehicles typically used for visual surveys. Combined, these factors permit several tens to more than a hundred hectares of the seafloor to be mapped in a single AUV deployment.
1042-8275
92-93
Thornton, Blair
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Bodenmann, Adrian
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Yamada, Takaki
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Stanley, David
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Massot Campos, Miguel
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Huvenne, Veerle
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Durden, Jennifer
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Bett, Brian
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Ruhl, Henry
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Newborough, Darryl
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Thornton, Blair
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Bodenmann, Adrian
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Yamada, Takaki
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Stanley, David
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Massot Campos, Miguel
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Huvenne, Veerle
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Durden, Jennifer
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Bett, Brian
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Ruhl, Henry
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Newborough, Darryl
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Thornton, Blair, Bodenmann, Adrian, Yamada, Takaki, Stanley, David, Massot Campos, Miguel, Huvenne, Veerle, Durden, Jennifer, Bett, Brian, Ruhl, Henry and Newborough, Darryl (2022) Visualizing multi-hectare seafloor habitats with BioCam. Oceanography, 34 (4), 92-93. (doi:10.5670/oceanog.2021.supplement.02-34).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Range or resolution? We often get asked this question when mapping the seafloor. And it is important because the type of data we choose to collect fundamentally changes the science that can follow. Photos taken by camera-equipped autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) represent one extreme of the range/resolution trade-off, where sub-centimeter resolutions can be achieved, but typically only from close ranges of 2 m to 3 m. Taking images from higher altitudes increases the area mapped during visual surveys in two ways. First, a larger footprint can be observed in each image, and second, the lower risk of collision with rugged terrains when operating at higher altitudes allows use of flight-style AUVs (e.g., Autosub6000 shown in Figure 1), which are faster and more energy efficient than the hover-capable vehicles typically used for visual surveys. Combined, these factors permit several tens to more than a hundred hectares of the seafloor to be mapped in a single AUV deployment.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 7 January 2022
Published date: 7 January 2022
Additional Information: Funding Information: This research is funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council’s Oceanids program? grant NE/P020887/1. The data used in this article are available on the benthic imaging repository Squidle+ (www.soi.squidle.org).

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 482999
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/482999
ISSN: 1042-8275
PURE UUID: aa42f994-2788-4969-aed6-59bfff9070fb
ORCID for Adrian Bodenmann: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3195-0602
ORCID for Takaki Yamada: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5090-7239
ORCID for David Stanley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3699-3203
ORCID for Miguel Massot Campos: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1202-0362
ORCID for Veerle Huvenne: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7135-6360

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Oct 2023 16:45
Last modified: 17 Nov 2023 02:57

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Contributors

Author: Blair Thornton
Author: Takaki Yamada ORCID iD
Author: David Stanley ORCID iD
Author: Veerle Huvenne ORCID iD
Author: Jennifer Durden
Author: Brian Bett
Author: Henry Ruhl
Author: Darryl Newborough

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