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Steatotic liver disease, MASLD and risk of chronic kidney disease

Steatotic liver disease, MASLD and risk of chronic kidney disease
Steatotic liver disease, MASLD and risk of chronic kidney disease
With the rising tide of fatty liver disease related to metabolic dysfunction worldwide, the association of this common liver disease with chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become increasingly evident. In 2020, the more inclusive term metabolic dysfunction-associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD) was proposed to replace the old term nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In 2023, a modified Delphi process was led by three large pan-national liver associations. There was consensus to change the fatty liver disease nomenclature and definition to include the presence of at least one of five common cardiometabolic risk factors as diagnostic criteria. The name chosen to replace NAFLD was metabolic dysfunction-associated steatotic liver disease (MASLD). The change of nomenclature from NAFLD to MAFLD and then MASLD has resulted in a reappraisal of the epidemiological trends and associations with the risk of developing CKD. The observed association between MAFLD/MASLD and CKD and our understanding that CKD can be an epiphenomenon linked to underlying metabolic dysfunction support the notion that individuals with MASLD are at substantially higher risk of incident CKD than those without MASLD. This narrative review provides an overview of the literature on (a) the evolution of criteria for diagnosing this highly prevalent metabolic liver disease, (b) the epidemiological evidence linking MASLD to the risk of CKD, (c) the underlying mechanisms by which MASLD (and factors strongly linked with MASLD) may increase the risk of developing CKD, and (d) the potential drug treatments that may benefit both MASLD and CKD.
CK, Chronic kidney disease, MAFLD, MASLD, NAFLD, Steatotic liver disease
1262-3636
Bilson, Josh
a99f9320-335c-47c8-bf30-07df48a5467d
Mantovani, Alessandro
8ec7c539-3d12-43e2-ba0c-29974de065f7
Byrne, Christopher D.
1370b997-cead-4229-83a7-53301ed2a43c
Targher, Giovanni
6d4878ed-6ae1-4e0f-b5b4-eade5746ec54
Bilson, Josh
a99f9320-335c-47c8-bf30-07df48a5467d
Mantovani, Alessandro
8ec7c539-3d12-43e2-ba0c-29974de065f7
Byrne, Christopher D.
1370b997-cead-4229-83a7-53301ed2a43c
Targher, Giovanni
6d4878ed-6ae1-4e0f-b5b4-eade5746ec54

Bilson, Josh, Mantovani, Alessandro, Byrne, Christopher D. and Targher, Giovanni (2024) Steatotic liver disease, MASLD and risk of chronic kidney disease. Diabetes & Metabolism, 50 (1), [101506]. (doi:10.1016/j.diabet.2023.101506).

Record type: Article

Abstract

With the rising tide of fatty liver disease related to metabolic dysfunction worldwide, the association of this common liver disease with chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become increasingly evident. In 2020, the more inclusive term metabolic dysfunction-associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD) was proposed to replace the old term nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In 2023, a modified Delphi process was led by three large pan-national liver associations. There was consensus to change the fatty liver disease nomenclature and definition to include the presence of at least one of five common cardiometabolic risk factors as diagnostic criteria. The name chosen to replace NAFLD was metabolic dysfunction-associated steatotic liver disease (MASLD). The change of nomenclature from NAFLD to MAFLD and then MASLD has resulted in a reappraisal of the epidemiological trends and associations with the risk of developing CKD. The observed association between MAFLD/MASLD and CKD and our understanding that CKD can be an epiphenomenon linked to underlying metabolic dysfunction support the notion that individuals with MASLD are at substantially higher risk of incident CKD than those without MASLD. This narrative review provides an overview of the literature on (a) the evolution of criteria for diagnosing this highly prevalent metabolic liver disease, (b) the epidemiological evidence linking MASLD to the risk of CKD, (c) the underlying mechanisms by which MASLD (and factors strongly linked with MASLD) may increase the risk of developing CKD, and (d) the potential drug treatments that may benefit both MASLD and CKD.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 18 December 2023
e-pub ahead of print date: 21 December 2023
Published date: 5 January 2024
Keywords: CK, Chronic kidney disease, MAFLD, MASLD, NAFLD, Steatotic liver disease

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 485752
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/485752
ISSN: 1262-3636
PURE UUID: a626657d-dfe7-4108-8fe4-fdccb65d4bad
ORCID for Josh Bilson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4665-3886
ORCID for Christopher D. Byrne: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6322-7753

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Dec 2023 20:33
Last modified: 10 Apr 2024 02:12

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Contributors

Author: Josh Bilson ORCID iD
Author: Alessandro Mantovani
Author: Giovanni Targher

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