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Achieving superplasticity at high strain rates using equal channel angular pressing

Achieving superplasticity at high strain rates using equal channel angular pressing
Achieving superplasticity at high strain rates using equal channel angular pressing
Equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) is a processing procedure in which a sample is pressed through a die containing a channel bent into an L shaped configuration. This procedure introduces a high strain into the sample without any change in the cross-sectional area and it may be used to attain an ultrafine grain size with dimensions lying typically within the submicrometer range. This paper describes a series of experiments where ECAP was applied to a commercial Al–Mg–Li–Zr alloy having an initial grain size of ~400 µm. The results demonstrate a refinement in the grain size of this alloy to ~1 µm and it is shown that these small grains are stable up to temperatures >600 K because of the presence of betaprime-Al3Zr particles. The stability of these ultrafine grains at elevated temperatures provides an opportunity to achieve superplastic ductilities in this alloy at very high strain rates: for example, the measured elongations to failure under optimum pressing conditions exceed 1000% at a strain rate of 10-1 s-1 when testing at temperatures above 600 K.
0267-0836
1330-1333
Furukawa, M.
8ea754fa-cd31-481d-b6b7-6a6968b1ee0e
Horita, Z.
84a80017-cbaf-4713-8346-6f69ac7ea63e
Nemoto, M.
37afe672-c5b3-4566-a16b-42e031d64b2d
Langdon, T.G.
86e69b4f-e16d-4830-bf8a-5a9c11f0de86
Furukawa, M.
8ea754fa-cd31-481d-b6b7-6a6968b1ee0e
Horita, Z.
84a80017-cbaf-4713-8346-6f69ac7ea63e
Nemoto, M.
37afe672-c5b3-4566-a16b-42e031d64b2d
Langdon, T.G.
86e69b4f-e16d-4830-bf8a-5a9c11f0de86

Furukawa, M., Horita, Z., Nemoto, M. and Langdon, T.G. (2000) Achieving superplasticity at high strain rates using equal channel angular pressing. Materials Science and Technology, 16 (11-12), 1330-1333.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) is a processing procedure in which a sample is pressed through a die containing a channel bent into an L shaped configuration. This procedure introduces a high strain into the sample without any change in the cross-sectional area and it may be used to attain an ultrafine grain size with dimensions lying typically within the submicrometer range. This paper describes a series of experiments where ECAP was applied to a commercial Al–Mg–Li–Zr alloy having an initial grain size of ~400 µm. The results demonstrate a refinement in the grain size of this alloy to ~1 µm and it is shown that these small grains are stable up to temperatures >600 K because of the presence of betaprime-Al3Zr particles. The stability of these ultrafine grains at elevated temperatures provides an opportunity to achieve superplastic ductilities in this alloy at very high strain rates: for example, the measured elongations to failure under optimum pressing conditions exceed 1000% at a strain rate of 10-1 s-1 when testing at temperatures above 600 K.

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More information

Published date: November 2000
Organisations: Engineering Mats & Surface Engineerg Gp

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 48652
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/48652
ISSN: 0267-0836
PURE UUID: 49299c1c-176c-4309-9d00-787f4b41a1c5
ORCID for T.G. Langdon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3541-9250

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Nov 2007
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:51

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