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A hierarchical life cycle cost model for a set of aero-engine components

A hierarchical life cycle cost model for a set of aero-engine components
A hierarchical life cycle cost model for a set of aero-engine components
The aero-engine is probably the most complex and vital part of civil and military aircrafts, and it is usually an important cost element of the aircraft at acquisition and operation periods. The reduction of acquisition, operation and support costs for civil and defence sectors is going to be the main driving force for aero-engine manufacturers during the next decades. Additionally, it is a well known fact that the maintenance costs of aero-engines can surpass their acquisition costs by a factor of two. Therefore, efficient and accurate prediction of aero-engine maintenance life cycle cost is vitally important for aero-engine manufacturers. For this paper we restrict ourselves to a simplified problem that deals with the life cycle cost of a set of aero-engine components, such as high pressure turbine blades, in isolation of other components of the engine. These engine components are assumed be suffering from a number of different deterioration mechanisms that may force that component to be repaired or replaced at predetermined shop visits. A hierarchical and object oriented costing model will be presented and its scope, extensibility and maintainability will be discussed.
Eres, Murat Hakki
b22e2d66-55c4-46d2-8ec3-46317033de43
Scanlan, James P.
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Eres, Murat Hakki
b22e2d66-55c4-46d2-8ec3-46317033de43
Scanlan, James P.
7ad738f2-d732-423f-a322-31fa4695529d

Eres, Murat Hakki and Scanlan, James P. (1970) A hierarchical life cycle cost model for a set of aero-engine components. 7th AIAA Aviation Technology, Integration and Operations Conference (ATIO 2007). 18 - 20 Sep 2007. 6 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The aero-engine is probably the most complex and vital part of civil and military aircrafts, and it is usually an important cost element of the aircraft at acquisition and operation periods. The reduction of acquisition, operation and support costs for civil and defence sectors is going to be the main driving force for aero-engine manufacturers during the next decades. Additionally, it is a well known fact that the maintenance costs of aero-engines can surpass their acquisition costs by a factor of two. Therefore, efficient and accurate prediction of aero-engine maintenance life cycle cost is vitally important for aero-engine manufacturers. For this paper we restrict ourselves to a simplified problem that deals with the life cycle cost of a set of aero-engine components, such as high pressure turbine blades, in isolation of other components of the engine. These engine components are assumed be suffering from a number of different deterioration mechanisms that may force that component to be repaired or replaced at predetermined shop visits. A hierarchical and object oriented costing model will be presented and its scope, extensibility and maintainability will be discussed.

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More information

Published date: 1 January 1970
Venue - Dates: 7th AIAA Aviation Technology, Integration and Operations Conference (ATIO 2007), 2007-09-18 - 2007-09-20

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 48833
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/48833
PURE UUID: 794fab6e-6b3c-4d66-8720-a28d0bac6203

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Date deposited: 17 Oct 2007
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:55

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