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Occlusion, transparency, and lightness

Occlusion, transparency, and lightness
Occlusion, transparency, and lightness
The lightness of a visual surface is its perceived achromatic reflectance [Adelson, E. H., (2000). Lightness perception and lightness illusions. In M. Gazzaniga (Ed.), The new cognitive neuroscience (2nd ed.) (pp. 339-351) Berlin: Springer; Gilchrist, A. (1999). Lightness perception. In R. W. F. Keil (Ed.), MIT encyclopedia of cognitive science (pp. 471-472). Cambridge: MIT press]. Lightness ranges from black, through various shades of grey, up to white. Anderson and Winawer [Anderson, B., Winawer, J. (2005). Image segmentation and lightness perception. Nature, 434, 79-83] suggested that perceptual decomposition of image luminance into multiple sources in different layers (e.g., perceptual transparency) is critical to the their lightness illusions. However, 1 show that simple perceptual occlusion evoked by T-junctions will work as well, suggesting that perceptual scission of luminance into multiple layers is unnecessary for such effects. I argue that the lightness illusions presented by Anderson and Winawer involve fundamentally different mechanisms than previously studied lightness illusions, including those involving perceptual transparency.
lightness, transparency, surface perception, occlusion, visual perception
0042-6989
3061-3069
Albert, Mark K.
a571e655-e2f4-40c4-8e11-934f5026dc38
Albert, Mark K.
a571e655-e2f4-40c4-8e11-934f5026dc38

Albert, Mark K. (2007) Occlusion, transparency, and lightness. Vision Research, 47 (24), 3061-3069. (doi:10.1016/j.visres.2007.06.004).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The lightness of a visual surface is its perceived achromatic reflectance [Adelson, E. H., (2000). Lightness perception and lightness illusions. In M. Gazzaniga (Ed.), The new cognitive neuroscience (2nd ed.) (pp. 339-351) Berlin: Springer; Gilchrist, A. (1999). Lightness perception. In R. W. F. Keil (Ed.), MIT encyclopedia of cognitive science (pp. 471-472). Cambridge: MIT press]. Lightness ranges from black, through various shades of grey, up to white. Anderson and Winawer [Anderson, B., Winawer, J. (2005). Image segmentation and lightness perception. Nature, 434, 79-83] suggested that perceptual decomposition of image luminance into multiple sources in different layers (e.g., perceptual transparency) is critical to the their lightness illusions. However, 1 show that simple perceptual occlusion evoked by T-junctions will work as well, suggesting that perceptual scission of luminance into multiple layers is unnecessary for such effects. I argue that the lightness illusions presented by Anderson and Winawer involve fundamentally different mechanisms than previously studied lightness illusions, including those involving perceptual transparency.

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Published date: November 2007
Keywords: lightness, transparency, surface perception, occlusion, visual perception

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 49009
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/49009
ISSN: 0042-6989
PURE UUID: 2c07143f-6cd3-40a9-afe2-abfb6303c847

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Date deposited: 30 Jul 2008
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 18:47

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Author: Mark K. Albert

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