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Compressibility of tyres for use in landfill drainage systems

Compressibility of tyres for use in landfill drainage systems
Compressibility of tyres for use in landfill drainage systems
Whole or shredded scrap tyres are sometimes proposed as an alternative to conventional aggregates in landfill drainage systems. Landfill basal drainage systems are, however, subjected to large overburden stresses from the overlying waste, which may compress a tyre drainage layer reducing its porosity and hence it effectiveness. Previous work has indicated that tyre drainage layers will remain effective under high stresses, but tests have in the main been restrictred to small (<100 mm) shred sizes. The use of coarser shreds or even whole tyres for landfill drainage systems may be advantageous as they are more economical to produce and may be less prone to clogging than smaller shreds. In this paper, the results of large-scale (2 m sample diameter) tests to investigate the compressibility of 50, 200 and 450 mm nominal-size tyre shreds are compared with data from the literature for smaller-size shreds and whole tyres. Tests were carried out at vertical stresses up to 600 kPa, representing landfill depths of up to about 60 m. Generally whole tyres and larger-size segments compress more in overall volume terms on initial loading than smaller size shreds. At vertical stresses greater than about 80 kPa, however, the differences on a graph of dry density or porosity plotted against vertical stress are much smaller. The proportion of voids that are not free-draining decreases with compression for whole tyres, as cup-like structures capable of retaining water flatten out. For tyre chips, the proportion of non-drainable voids increases with compression, suggesting that flow pathways are being lost. The dependence of the compressive behaviour of tyres and tyre chips on the particle shape is discussed, and the need for a more detailed and rigorous way of characterising particle size and shape is highlighted.
drainage & irrigation/landfill/recycling & reuse of materials/waste management & disposal
1747-6526
173-180
Beaven, R.P.
5893d749-f03c-4c55-b9c9-e90f00a32b57
Powrie, W.
600c3f02-00f8-4486-ae4b-b4fc8ec77c3c
Hudson, A.P.
c834356f-d618-49d2-a8cc-cd338e1a87a4
Parkes, D.J.
4d355548-759f-4db6-8ce8-ac810dab1e6f
Beaven, R.P.
5893d749-f03c-4c55-b9c9-e90f00a32b57
Powrie, W.
600c3f02-00f8-4486-ae4b-b4fc8ec77c3c
Hudson, A.P.
c834356f-d618-49d2-a8cc-cd338e1a87a4
Parkes, D.J.
4d355548-759f-4db6-8ce8-ac810dab1e6f

Beaven, R.P., Powrie, W., Hudson, A.P. and Parkes, D.J. (2006) Compressibility of tyres for use in landfill drainage systems. Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Waste and Resource Management, 159 (WR4), 173-180. (doi:10.1680/warm.2006.159.4.173).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Whole or shredded scrap tyres are sometimes proposed as an alternative to conventional aggregates in landfill drainage systems. Landfill basal drainage systems are, however, subjected to large overburden stresses from the overlying waste, which may compress a tyre drainage layer reducing its porosity and hence it effectiveness. Previous work has indicated that tyre drainage layers will remain effective under high stresses, but tests have in the main been restrictred to small (<100 mm) shred sizes. The use of coarser shreds or even whole tyres for landfill drainage systems may be advantageous as they are more economical to produce and may be less prone to clogging than smaller shreds. In this paper, the results of large-scale (2 m sample diameter) tests to investigate the compressibility of 50, 200 and 450 mm nominal-size tyre shreds are compared with data from the literature for smaller-size shreds and whole tyres. Tests were carried out at vertical stresses up to 600 kPa, representing landfill depths of up to about 60 m. Generally whole tyres and larger-size segments compress more in overall volume terms on initial loading than smaller size shreds. At vertical stresses greater than about 80 kPa, however, the differences on a graph of dry density or porosity plotted against vertical stress are much smaller. The proportion of voids that are not free-draining decreases with compression for whole tyres, as cup-like structures capable of retaining water flatten out. For tyre chips, the proportion of non-drainable voids increases with compression, suggesting that flow pathways are being lost. The dependence of the compressive behaviour of tyres and tyre chips on the particle shape is discussed, and the need for a more detailed and rigorous way of characterising particle size and shape is highlighted.

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More information

Submitted date: 26 October 2006
Published date: November 2006
Keywords: drainage & irrigation/landfill/recycling & reuse of materials/waste management & disposal

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 49285
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/49285
ISSN: 1747-6526
PURE UUID: 8dcb6e6c-1a59-4228-8fc6-cbe8e7eed417
ORCID for R.P. Beaven: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1387-8299
ORCID for W. Powrie: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2271-0826

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Oct 2007
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:52

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