The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Cavitación y cetáceos. [Cavitation and cetacean]

Cavitación y cetáceos. [Cavitation and cetacean]
Cavitación y cetáceos. [Cavitation and cetacean]
Bubbles are the most acoustically active naturally occurring entities in the ocean, and cetaceans are the most intelligent. Having evolved over tens of millions of years to cope with the underwater acoustic environment, cetaceans may have developed techniques from which we could learn. This paper outlines some of the possible interactions, ranging from the exploitation of acoustics in bubble nets to trap prey, to techniques for echolocating in bubbly water, to the possibility that man-made sonar signals could be responsible for bubble generation and death within cetaceans.
Resumen
Las burbujas son las entidades naturales del océano más activas acústicamente, y los cetáceos las más inteligentes. Tras decenas de millones de años de evolución para adaptarse al entorno acústico submarino, los cetáceos pueden haber desarrollado una serie de técnicas de las que bien podríamos aprender.
Este artículo pone de relieve algunas posibles interacciones, que van desde la explotación de la acústica en redes de burbujas utilizadas como trampas para presas, hasta técnicas para la ¿ecolocación¿ en aguas burbujeantes, o la posibilidad de que las señales sonares provocadas por el hombre sean responsables de la generación de burbujas y de muerte de cetáceos.
0210-3680
37-74
Leighton, Timothy G.
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae
Finfer, Daniel C.
a4dfa709-4f6d-4b4f-9ecb-47fe38d1efe8
White, Paul R.
2dd2477b-5aa9-42e2-9d19-0806d994eaba
Leighton, Timothy G.
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae
Finfer, Daniel C.
a4dfa709-4f6d-4b4f-9ecb-47fe38d1efe8
White, Paul R.
2dd2477b-5aa9-42e2-9d19-0806d994eaba

Leighton, Timothy G., Finfer, Daniel C. and White, Paul R. (2007) Cavitación y cetáceos. [Cavitation and cetacean]. Revista de acustica, 38 (3-4), 37-74.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Bubbles are the most acoustically active naturally occurring entities in the ocean, and cetaceans are the most intelligent. Having evolved over tens of millions of years to cope with the underwater acoustic environment, cetaceans may have developed techniques from which we could learn. This paper outlines some of the possible interactions, ranging from the exploitation of acoustics in bubble nets to trap prey, to techniques for echolocating in bubbly water, to the possibility that man-made sonar signals could be responsible for bubble generation and death within cetaceans.
Resumen
Las burbujas son las entidades naturales del océano más activas acústicamente, y los cetáceos las más inteligentes. Tras decenas de millones de años de evolución para adaptarse al entorno acústico submarino, los cetáceos pueden haber desarrollado una serie de técnicas de las que bien podríamos aprender.
Este artículo pone de relieve algunas posibles interacciones, que van desde la explotación de la acústica en redes de burbujas utilizadas como trampas para presas, hasta técnicas para la ¿ecolocación¿ en aguas burbujeantes, o la posibilidad de que las señales sonares provocadas por el hombre sean responsables de la generación de burbujas y de muerte de cetáceos.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2007

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 49459
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/49459
ISSN: 0210-3680
PURE UUID: d6dfb699-0de8-4a30-90fe-3006e629202d
ORCID for Timothy G. Leighton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1649-8750
ORCID for Paul R. White: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4787-8713

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Dec 2007
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:54

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×