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UV written waveguides: applications in telecoms and sensors

UV written waveguides: applications in telecoms and sensors
UV written waveguides: applications in telecoms and sensors
In recent years, ultra-violet laser direct writing has been recognized as a technique that provides a powerful way of creating integrated optical devices. We will describe the developments in this field, concentrating on the use of two-beam writing to create Bragg gratings in planar integrated format. In this paper we will show how our UV writing technique can be used to fabricate structures required in a wide range of applications, from the creation of wide-band couplers, through to highly sensitive integrated sensor devices. The direct computer control in UV direct writing removes many of the constraints that normally limit planar integrated optics. In particular, it dispenses with the photolithography and etching steps traditionally required to make low-loss waveguide devices. The work reported will show how this flexibility of UV writing may be enhanced by using novel substrate structures that allow new device types. Results will be presented on Bragg grating sensors for solvent purity, biological layer measurement, phase changes and strain. Further results will include a demonstration of Liquid Crystal tuned Bragg grating devices yielding greater than 100GHz spectral tuning. Novel substrate configurations include a flat-fibre geometry based on MCVD fibre preform manufacture allowing devices with millimetre scale widths and 10's of cm lengths.
Smith, P.G.R.
8979668a-8b7a-4838-9a74-1a7cfc6665f6
Smith, P.G.R.
8979668a-8b7a-4838-9a74-1a7cfc6665f6

Smith, P.G.R. (2007) UV written waveguides: applications in telecoms and sensors. 2nd European Optical Society Topical Meeting (OMS' 07). 30 Sep - 03 Oct 2007. 1 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

In recent years, ultra-violet laser direct writing has been recognized as a technique that provides a powerful way of creating integrated optical devices. We will describe the developments in this field, concentrating on the use of two-beam writing to create Bragg gratings in planar integrated format. In this paper we will show how our UV writing technique can be used to fabricate structures required in a wide range of applications, from the creation of wide-band couplers, through to highly sensitive integrated sensor devices. The direct computer control in UV direct writing removes many of the constraints that normally limit planar integrated optics. In particular, it dispenses with the photolithography and etching steps traditionally required to make low-loss waveguide devices. The work reported will show how this flexibility of UV writing may be enhanced by using novel substrate structures that allow new device types. Results will be presented on Bragg grating sensors for solvent purity, biological layer measurement, phase changes and strain. Further results will include a demonstration of Liquid Crystal tuned Bragg grating devices yielding greater than 100GHz spectral tuning. Novel substrate configurations include a flat-fibre geometry based on MCVD fibre preform manufacture allowing devices with millimetre scale widths and 10's of cm lengths.

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Published date: 2007
Venue - Dates: 2nd European Optical Society Topical Meeting (OMS' 07), 2007-09-30 - 2007-10-03

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 49803
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/49803
PURE UUID: b1b495fe-3360-4bb9-9e0c-c866e592a6d9

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Date deposited: 05 Dec 2007
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:53

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