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Global subjective memorability and the strength-based mirror effect

Global subjective memorability and the strength-based mirror effect
Global subjective memorability and the strength-based mirror effect
Between-list manipulations of memory strength through repetition commonly generate a mirror effect, with more hits, and fewer false alarms for strengthened items. However, this pattern is rarely seen with within-list manipulations of strength. Three experiments investigated the conditions under which a within-list mirror effect of strength (items presented once or thrice) is observed. In Experiments 1 and 2, we indirectly manipulated the overall subjective memorability of the studied lists by varying the proportion of non-words. A within-list mirror effect was observed only in Experiment 2, where a higher proportion of non-words was presented in the study list. In Experiment 3, the presentation duration for each item (0.5 s versus 3 s) was manipulated between groups with the purpose of affecting subjective memorability: A within-list mirror effect was observed only for the short-presentation durations. Thus, across three experiments, we found the within-list mirror effect only under conditions of poor overall subjective memorability. We propose that when the overall subjective memorability is low, people switch their response strategy on an item-by-item basis, and that this generates the observed mirror effect.
0090-502X
807-818
Bruno, D.
5ca73de2-1706-420b-a7bf-8c6a5e474221
Higham, P.A.
4093b28f-7d58-4d18-89d4-021792e418e7
Perfect, T.J.
af06e4b9-8ba1-41df-9534-b3118f23b9c0
Bruno, D.
5ca73de2-1706-420b-a7bf-8c6a5e474221
Higham, P.A.
4093b28f-7d58-4d18-89d4-021792e418e7
Perfect, T.J.
af06e4b9-8ba1-41df-9534-b3118f23b9c0

Bruno, D., Higham, P.A. and Perfect, T.J. (2009) Global subjective memorability and the strength-based mirror effect. Memory & Cognition, 37 (6), 807-818. (doi:10.3758/MC.37.6.807).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Between-list manipulations of memory strength through repetition commonly generate a mirror effect, with more hits, and fewer false alarms for strengthened items. However, this pattern is rarely seen with within-list manipulations of strength. Three experiments investigated the conditions under which a within-list mirror effect of strength (items presented once or thrice) is observed. In Experiments 1 and 2, we indirectly manipulated the overall subjective memorability of the studied lists by varying the proportion of non-words. A within-list mirror effect was observed only in Experiment 2, where a higher proportion of non-words was presented in the study list. In Experiment 3, the presentation duration for each item (0.5 s versus 3 s) was manipulated between groups with the purpose of affecting subjective memorability: A within-list mirror effect was observed only for the short-presentation durations. Thus, across three experiments, we found the within-list mirror effect only under conditions of poor overall subjective memorability. We propose that when the overall subjective memorability is low, people switch their response strategy on an item-by-item basis, and that this generates the observed mirror effect.

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Published date: September 2009

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Local EPrints ID: 50125
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/50125
ISSN: 0090-502X
PURE UUID: 08e30f8d-78ec-4415-8cb5-e9daea3ba346

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Date deposited: 22 Jul 2009
Last modified: 04 Nov 2019 19:06

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