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Inhibitory deficits in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are independent of basic processing efficiency and IQ

Inhibitory deficits in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are independent of basic processing efficiency and IQ
Inhibitory deficits in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are independent of basic processing efficiency and IQ
Background. A substantial proportion of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) show deficits on inhibitory control tests. However, questions remain about (i) the extent of these deficits across different inhibitory domains, (ii) their relationship to deficits in non-executive processes and (iii) whether they extend into adolescence.
Methods. Seventy-seven children and adolescents with ADHD and 50 non-ADHD controls completed three inhibitory tasks, a simple two choice RT task (2CR) and an IQ assessment.
Results. ADHD was moderately associated with deficits on all tasks (effect sizes d=0.5–0.9). Deficits were equally marked in childhood and adolescence. Inhibitory deficits were not associated with IQ and, although reduced substantially, remained significant after performance on a simple reaction time task was controlled for statistically.
Discussion. In highlighting the significant, but limited, role of inhibitory deficits in ADHD, these results are consistent with recent accounts that emphasize the neuropsychological heterogeneity of this condition.
attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, executive function, stroop task, go/no-go task, inhibitory control, reaction time, reaction time variability, stop signal task
0300-9564
261-268
Bitsakou, P.
68ff8113-a215-4cee-9897-a047acdc65e8
Psychogiou, L.
ec226c15-0230-458a-b57f-2f07897fba2e
Thompson, M.
bfe8522c-b252-4771-8036-744e93357c67
Sonuga-Barke, E.J.S.
bc80bf95-6cf9-4c76-a09d-eaaf0b717635
Bitsakou, P.
68ff8113-a215-4cee-9897-a047acdc65e8
Psychogiou, L.
ec226c15-0230-458a-b57f-2f07897fba2e
Thompson, M.
bfe8522c-b252-4771-8036-744e93357c67
Sonuga-Barke, E.J.S.
bc80bf95-6cf9-4c76-a09d-eaaf0b717635

Bitsakou, P., Psychogiou, L., Thompson, M. and Sonuga-Barke, E.J.S. (2008) Inhibitory deficits in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are independent of basic processing efficiency and IQ. Journal of Neural Transmission, 115 (2), 261-268. (doi:10.1007/s00702-007-0828-z).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background. A substantial proportion of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) show deficits on inhibitory control tests. However, questions remain about (i) the extent of these deficits across different inhibitory domains, (ii) their relationship to deficits in non-executive processes and (iii) whether they extend into adolescence.
Methods. Seventy-seven children and adolescents with ADHD and 50 non-ADHD controls completed three inhibitory tasks, a simple two choice RT task (2CR) and an IQ assessment.
Results. ADHD was moderately associated with deficits on all tasks (effect sizes d=0.5–0.9). Deficits were equally marked in childhood and adolescence. Inhibitory deficits were not associated with IQ and, although reduced substantially, remained significant after performance on a simple reaction time task was controlled for statistically.
Discussion. In highlighting the significant, but limited, role of inhibitory deficits in ADHD, these results are consistent with recent accounts that emphasize the neuropsychological heterogeneity of this condition.

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More information

Published date: February 2008
Keywords: attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, executive function, stroop task, go/no-go task, inhibitory control, reaction time, reaction time variability, stop signal task

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 50349
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/50349
ISSN: 0300-9564
PURE UUID: b1e37f11-4e79-458d-92b3-18cfb702747e

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Date deposited: 19 Feb 2008
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:52

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