The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Through thick and thin: our work with chalcogenide materials, thin films and devices

Through thick and thin: our work with chalcogenide materials, thin films and devices
Through thick and thin: our work with chalcogenide materials, thin films and devices
Interest in chalcogenide materials has, over the last decade, increased significantly as glasses, crystals and alloys find new life in a wide range of modern devices. Many of these applications require chalcogenide films, from nanometer to millimeter thicknesses, to exploit the functionality of this material family; however there are other geometries, notably optical fibre, microspheres, nanoparticles and nanowires which are of great interest. Our own research in this field has concentrated on amorphous chalcogenides formed with new compositions based on gallium and/or germanium sulphides. Through modification of this relatively unknown family of chalcogenides, new compositions with new and desirable properties were synthesized. These glass forming groups offer an alternative to the better known arsenic- or selenium- or tellurium- based glasses, providing lower toxicity, higher melting temperatures as well as the ability to be modified with a wide range of dopants including rare earths, transition and precious metals. The exploitation of chalcogenide materials has evolved over the last two or three decades from a simple infrared transmitting bulk glass into a multifunctional optoelectronic material for the future. We hope that with this talk you will see our own small role in this evolution and share in our excitement for these materials in the future.
Hewak, D.W.
87c80070-c101-4f7a-914f-4cc3131e3db0
Hewak, D.W.
87c80070-c101-4f7a-914f-4cc3131e3db0

Hewak, D.W. (2008) Through thick and thin: our work with chalcogenide materials, thin films and devices. 6th International Workshop on Nanophotonics, Taipei, Taiwan. 11 Mar 2008.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Interest in chalcogenide materials has, over the last decade, increased significantly as glasses, crystals and alloys find new life in a wide range of modern devices. Many of these applications require chalcogenide films, from nanometer to millimeter thicknesses, to exploit the functionality of this material family; however there are other geometries, notably optical fibre, microspheres, nanoparticles and nanowires which are of great interest. Our own research in this field has concentrated on amorphous chalcogenides formed with new compositions based on gallium and/or germanium sulphides. Through modification of this relatively unknown family of chalcogenides, new compositions with new and desirable properties were synthesized. These glass forming groups offer an alternative to the better known arsenic- or selenium- or tellurium- based glasses, providing lower toxicity, higher melting temperatures as well as the ability to be modified with a wide range of dopants including rare earths, transition and precious metals. The exploitation of chalcogenide materials has evolved over the last two or three decades from a simple infrared transmitting bulk glass into a multifunctional optoelectronic material for the future. We hope that with this talk you will see our own small role in this evolution and share in our excitement for these materials in the future.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 11 March 2008
Additional Information: Invited paper
Venue - Dates: 6th International Workshop on Nanophotonics, Taipei, Taiwan, 2008-03-11 - 2008-03-11

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 50679
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/50679
PURE UUID: 37d3b909-2d4b-415a-bdd6-e96220f55b19
ORCID for D.W. Hewak: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2093-5773

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Mar 2008
Last modified: 18 May 2021 01:35

Export record

Contributors

Author: D.W. Hewak ORCID iD

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×