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Windsurfer fin hydrodynamics

Windsurfer fin hydrodynamics
Windsurfer fin hydrodynamics
Fin hydrodynamics of a windsurfer L. Sutherland & RA. Wilson Department of Ship Science, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton, 1 Introduction Windsurfing is a relatively new technical sport and has advanced rapidly in the quality of equipment, with the consequent increase in speed and technique that only time can allow. The initial developments were aimed at the obvious compo- nents such as the sail rig and the shape of the board itself. The remaining item of the windsurfer, the fin, was initially thought of as providing a control surface for directional stability, similar to the effects of a tail fin of an aeroplane. Of course this is far from the truth, since the driving force derived from the sail rig, has to be resisted by the fin. Thus the windsurfer must be thought of as a combined system of a board, rig and the fin. This paper will concentrate on the fin geome- try and our ability to derive design force estimates, so that suitable matching of board to fin.
1853123447
10.2495CMO940061
51-58
Computational Mechanics Publications
Sutherland, L.
6d8aaa70-b77a-4865-abef-d5e92ec74b5e
Wilson, P.A.
8307fa11-5d5e-47f6-9961-9d43767afa00
Sutherland, L.
6d8aaa70-b77a-4865-abef-d5e92ec74b5e
Wilson, P.A.
8307fa11-5d5e-47f6-9961-9d43767afa00

Sutherland, L. and Wilson, P.A. (1994) Windsurfer fin hydrodynamics. In Marine, Offshore and Ice Technology. Computational Mechanics Publications. pp. 51-58 . (doi:10.2495CMO940061).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Fin hydrodynamics of a windsurfer L. Sutherland & RA. Wilson Department of Ship Science, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton, 1 Introduction Windsurfing is a relatively new technical sport and has advanced rapidly in the quality of equipment, with the consequent increase in speed and technique that only time can allow. The initial developments were aimed at the obvious compo- nents such as the sail rig and the shape of the board itself. The remaining item of the windsurfer, the fin, was initially thought of as providing a control surface for directional stability, similar to the effects of a tail fin of an aeroplane. Of course this is far from the truth, since the driving force derived from the sail rig, has to be resisted by the fin. Thus the windsurfer must be thought of as a combined system of a board, rig and the fin. This paper will concentrate on the fin geome- try and our ability to derive design force estimates, so that suitable matching of board to fin.

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10.2495CMO940061 - Version of Record
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More information

Published date: 13 September 1994
Venue - Dates: Computer-aided Design, Manufacture and Operation in the Marine and Offshore Industries, United Kingdom, 1994-09-12 - 1994-09-14
Organisations: Fluid Structure Interactions Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 51084
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/51084
ISBN: 1853123447
PURE UUID: 3350841c-5f8b-4fcb-9338-dbb8386ba109
ORCID for P.A. Wilson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6939-682X

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Date deposited: 08 May 2008
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:34

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