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Interpretation of emotionally ambiguous faces in older adults

Interpretation of emotionally ambiguous faces in older adults
Interpretation of emotionally ambiguous faces in older adults
Research suggests that there is an age-related decline in the processing of negative emotional information, which
may contribute to the reported decline in emotional problems in older people. We used a signal detection
approach to investigate the effect of normal aging on the interpretation of ambiguous emotional facial expressions.
High-functioning older and younger adults indicated which emotion they perceived when presented with morphed
faces containing a 60% to 40% blend of two emotions (mixtures of happy, sad, or angry faces). They also
completed measures of mood, perceptual ability, and cognitive functioning. Older and younger adults did not
differ significantly in their ability to discriminate between positive and negative emotions. Response-bias
measures indicated that older adults were significantly less likely than younger adults to report the presence of
anger in angry-–happy face blends. Results are discussed in relation to other research into age-related effects on
emotion processing.
Emotion recognition, Ageing, Facial emotion
1079-5014
337-343
Bucks, R.S.
59acfbce-ed79-45b1-82e0-3f493a3b63a0
Garner, M.
3221c5b3-b951-4fec-b456-ec449e4ce072
Tarrant, L.
9cb4f439-8722-43c8-9f15-cb7b5fcf12d7
Bradley, B.P.
bdacaa6c-528b-4086-9448-27ebfe463514
Mogg, K.
5f1474af-85f5-4fd3-8eb6-0371be848e30
Bucks, R.S.
59acfbce-ed79-45b1-82e0-3f493a3b63a0
Garner, M.
3221c5b3-b951-4fec-b456-ec449e4ce072
Tarrant, L.
9cb4f439-8722-43c8-9f15-cb7b5fcf12d7
Bradley, B.P.
bdacaa6c-528b-4086-9448-27ebfe463514
Mogg, K.
5f1474af-85f5-4fd3-8eb6-0371be848e30

Bucks, R.S., Garner, M., Tarrant, L., Bradley, B.P. and Mogg, K. (2008) Interpretation of emotionally ambiguous faces in older adults. The Journals of Gerontology, Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 63B (6), 337-343.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Research suggests that there is an age-related decline in the processing of negative emotional information, which
may contribute to the reported decline in emotional problems in older people. We used a signal detection
approach to investigate the effect of normal aging on the interpretation of ambiguous emotional facial expressions.
High-functioning older and younger adults indicated which emotion they perceived when presented with morphed
faces containing a 60% to 40% blend of two emotions (mixtures of happy, sad, or angry faces). They also
completed measures of mood, perceptual ability, and cognitive functioning. Older and younger adults did not
differ significantly in their ability to discriminate between positive and negative emotions. Response-bias
measures indicated that older adults were significantly less likely than younger adults to report the presence of
anger in angry-–happy face blends. Results are discussed in relation to other research into age-related effects on
emotion processing.

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More information

Published date: November 2008
Additional Information: http://psychsocgerontology.oxfordjournals.org/content/63/6/P337.full.pdf+html
Keywords: Emotion recognition, Ageing, Facial emotion

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 51253
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/51253
ISSN: 1079-5014
PURE UUID: 17200bc9-9270-4ae9-b44e-5316c0741f29
ORCID for B.P. Bradley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2801-4271

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 May 2008
Last modified: 18 May 2019 00:36

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