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Is there a relationship between the Myers-Briggs type indicator and emotional intelligence?

Is there a relationship between the Myers-Briggs type indicator and emotional intelligence?
Is there a relationship between the Myers-Briggs type indicator and emotional intelligence?
The increasing interest in the role of emotion in organisational life (Fineman, 1997) combined with the “explosive” growth in Emotional Intelligence (Higgs and Dulewicz, 1999) has highlighted the need for research which examines the relationship between models and instruments which explore this area.
In looking at the challenges faced by organisations and leaders in the new millennium, a number of authors (e.g. Subir, 2000; Kouzes and Posner, 2000; Dainty and Anderson, 2000) have indicated the need to explore and develop leaders’ abilities in this area. Some have suggested that instruments such as the Myers Briggs Type indicator (MBTI) provide a good vehicle for exploring and developing an individual’s Emotional Intelligence [EI] (e.g. Dainty and Anderson, 2000). Whilst there have been some examinations of the relationship between Emotional Intelligence and the MBTI, these have been largely tangential to the major research thrust (Dulewicz and Higgs, 1999a).
In this paper the results of a research study, covering 177 managers, are presented. This research was designed specifically to examine the relationship between Emotional Intelligence and the MBTI profiles of the sample population. The study indicates that the dominant MBTI function of Intuition (and the associated MBTI profiles) is significantly and positively related to higher levels of Emotional Intelligence. In looking at specific MBTI scales, the lack of significant relationships between high Feeling scores and EI is seen as somewhat surprising. However, this may in part be due to under-representation of high “Feeling” participants in the research study and, in part, due to methodological limitations of comparing data from normative and ipsative instruments.
Overall the study provides some support for the proposed relationship between the MBTI and EI and also highlights potential areas for future research.
HWP 2000/07
Henley Business School, Univeristy of Reading
Higgs, M.J.
bd61667f-4b7c-4caf-9d79-aee907c03ae3
Higgs, M.J.
bd61667f-4b7c-4caf-9d79-aee907c03ae3

Higgs, M.J. (2000) Is there a relationship between the Myers-Briggs type indicator and emotional intelligence? (Henley Working Paper Series, HWP 2000/07) Henley, UK. Henley Business School, Univeristy of Reading

Record type: Monograph (Working Paper)

Abstract

The increasing interest in the role of emotion in organisational life (Fineman, 1997) combined with the “explosive” growth in Emotional Intelligence (Higgs and Dulewicz, 1999) has highlighted the need for research which examines the relationship between models and instruments which explore this area.
In looking at the challenges faced by organisations and leaders in the new millennium, a number of authors (e.g. Subir, 2000; Kouzes and Posner, 2000; Dainty and Anderson, 2000) have indicated the need to explore and develop leaders’ abilities in this area. Some have suggested that instruments such as the Myers Briggs Type indicator (MBTI) provide a good vehicle for exploring and developing an individual’s Emotional Intelligence [EI] (e.g. Dainty and Anderson, 2000). Whilst there have been some examinations of the relationship between Emotional Intelligence and the MBTI, these have been largely tangential to the major research thrust (Dulewicz and Higgs, 1999a).
In this paper the results of a research study, covering 177 managers, are presented. This research was designed specifically to examine the relationship between Emotional Intelligence and the MBTI profiles of the sample population. The study indicates that the dominant MBTI function of Intuition (and the associated MBTI profiles) is significantly and positively related to higher levels of Emotional Intelligence. In looking at specific MBTI scales, the lack of significant relationships between high Feeling scores and EI is seen as somewhat surprising. However, this may in part be due to under-representation of high “Feeling” participants in the research study and, in part, due to methodological limitations of comparing data from normative and ipsative instruments.
Overall the study provides some support for the proposed relationship between the MBTI and EI and also highlights potential areas for future research.

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Published date: 2000

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 51512
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/51512
PURE UUID: 99463654-fabc-4e59-b742-e55e9bff25e8

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Date deposited: 21 Aug 2008
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:48

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