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Teams and teamworking: what do we know?

Teams and teamworking: what do we know?
Teams and teamworking: what do we know?
This paper reviews the extensive literature on teams and teamworking in order to identify the nature and extent of the evidence that teamworking can lead to superior performance. It demonstrates that much of the case for teamwork is based on earlier group research (Ray and Bronstein, 1995; Guzzo and Shea, 1992) and that this is inconclusive and often contradictory in terms of performance relationships (Furnham, 1992; West and Slater; 1995). Direct research evidence relating to teams in an organisational context is limited (West and Slater, 1995), but growing (Higgs, 1998; 1999). A major challenge in establishing the relationship between teamworking and performance is the sheer complexity in the interrelationships between many variables (Schein, 1998; Furnham, 1992). However, the use of the interaction process models (Hackman and Morris, 1975) is beginning to shed light on some of these complex relationships and provide performance related evidence (West and Anderson, 1996; Higgs, 1998).
HWP 9911
Henley Business School, University of Reading
Higgs, M.J.
bd61667f-4b7c-4caf-9d79-aee907c03ae3
Higgs, M.J.
bd61667f-4b7c-4caf-9d79-aee907c03ae3

Higgs, M.J. (1999) Teams and teamworking: what do we know? (Henley Working Paper Series, HWP 9911) Henley, UK. Henley Business School, University of Reading

Record type: Monograph (Working Paper)

Abstract

This paper reviews the extensive literature on teams and teamworking in order to identify the nature and extent of the evidence that teamworking can lead to superior performance. It demonstrates that much of the case for teamwork is based on earlier group research (Ray and Bronstein, 1995; Guzzo and Shea, 1992) and that this is inconclusive and often contradictory in terms of performance relationships (Furnham, 1992; West and Slater; 1995). Direct research evidence relating to teams in an organisational context is limited (West and Slater, 1995), but growing (Higgs, 1998; 1999). A major challenge in establishing the relationship between teamworking and performance is the sheer complexity in the interrelationships between many variables (Schein, 1998; Furnham, 1992). However, the use of the interaction process models (Hackman and Morris, 1975) is beginning to shed light on some of these complex relationships and provide performance related evidence (West and Anderson, 1996; Higgs, 1998).

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Published date: 1999

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 51517
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/51517
PURE UUID: fa605e87-9057-41af-a7ec-97f1306c1ca7

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Date deposited: 21 Aug 2008
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:48

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