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Modelling the trajectories of migrating Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

Modelling the trajectories of migrating Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)
Modelling the trajectories of migrating Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)
This paper describes a model for simulating the trajectories of migrating Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in the ocean. Surface current and temperature representations were used as boundary conditions for simulation of migration trajectories. Representations of surface currents were derived from a general circulation model forced by realistic winds and then tested through comparisons with observed trajectories of drifting buoys. Observed climatology data were used to represent sea surface temperature patterns. The model was used to simulate the trajectories of 15 individual salmon that were tagged in their home rivers and subsequently recaptured at sea. In contrast to a random swimming direction model, trajectories simulated using both rheotaxis and thermotaxis as direction-finding mechanisms passed close to the recapture locations of the salmon. The timings and positions of the trajectories simulated using rheotaxis corresponded more closely with the observed data than those simulated using thermotaxis. This work indicates that either rheotaxis or thermotaxis, or a combination of the two, are possible direction-finding mechanisms for migrating Atlantic salmon.
0706-652X
352-361
Booker, D.J.
974f4dc2-3d5f-46db-aa23-d6ce3923d005
Wells, N.C.
4c27167c-f972-4822-9614-d6ca8d8223b5
Smith, I.P.
751766ba-dd51-4419-a5ad-a582d9c45c6e
Booker, D.J.
974f4dc2-3d5f-46db-aa23-d6ce3923d005
Wells, N.C.
4c27167c-f972-4822-9614-d6ca8d8223b5
Smith, I.P.
751766ba-dd51-4419-a5ad-a582d9c45c6e

Booker, D.J., Wells, N.C. and Smith, I.P. (2008) Modelling the trajectories of migrating Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, 65 (3), 352-361. (doi:10.1139/F07-173).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper describes a model for simulating the trajectories of migrating Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in the ocean. Surface current and temperature representations were used as boundary conditions for simulation of migration trajectories. Representations of surface currents were derived from a general circulation model forced by realistic winds and then tested through comparisons with observed trajectories of drifting buoys. Observed climatology data were used to represent sea surface temperature patterns. The model was used to simulate the trajectories of 15 individual salmon that were tagged in their home rivers and subsequently recaptured at sea. In contrast to a random swimming direction model, trajectories simulated using both rheotaxis and thermotaxis as direction-finding mechanisms passed close to the recapture locations of the salmon. The timings and positions of the trajectories simulated using rheotaxis corresponded more closely with the observed data than those simulated using thermotaxis. This work indicates that either rheotaxis or thermotaxis, or a combination of the two, are possible direction-finding mechanisms for migrating Atlantic salmon.

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Published date: March 2008

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 52017
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/52017
ISSN: 0706-652X
PURE UUID: ed1a7367-4630-4342-91b7-0de4921607f6

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Date deposited: 03 Jun 2008
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:47

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