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The theory and application of quadratic minimization in the active reduction of sound and vibration

The theory and application of quadratic minimization in the active reduction of sound and vibration
The theory and application of quadratic minimization in the active reduction of sound and vibration
Active sound reduction is the use of active sources of sound, that is devices which are potentially sources of sound energy, to modify a preexisting sound field in such a way that the overall effect is a reduction in sound. Until recently the most common approach in active sound control was to attempt to achieve complete cancellation of the sound. This is possible at single points but is practically impossible over an appreciable region. A more modest and practical aim is to try to reduce the sound field by as much as possible by minimizing some overall measure of the amplitude of the sound field.
This thesis examines the technique of sound field minimization. Candidate sound field measures which are suitable for minimization are presented and discussed. The quantities include acoustic energy, intensity and power flow as well as a practical measure, the sum of the squares of the signals from a number of sensors. Theoretical simulations and experimental implementations are used to evaluate sound field minimization techniques. The discussion and experiments are extended to the active reduction of structural vibrations.
Curtis, A.R.D.
6bda895c-1912-425a-a84d-560a9fd1abcb
Curtis, A.R.D.
6bda895c-1912-425a-a84d-560a9fd1abcb
Nelson, Philip
5c6f5cc9-ea52-4fe2-9edf-05d696b0c1a9
Elliott, Stephen
721dc55c-8c3e-4895-b9c4-82f62abd3567

Curtis, A.R.D. (1988) The theory and application of quadratic minimization in the active reduction of sound and vibration. University of Southampton, Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, Doctoral Thesis, 144pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Active sound reduction is the use of active sources of sound, that is devices which are potentially sources of sound energy, to modify a preexisting sound field in such a way that the overall effect is a reduction in sound. Until recently the most common approach in active sound control was to attempt to achieve complete cancellation of the sound. This is possible at single points but is practically impossible over an appreciable region. A more modest and practical aim is to try to reduce the sound field by as much as possible by minimizing some overall measure of the amplitude of the sound field.
This thesis examines the technique of sound field minimization. Candidate sound field measures which are suitable for minimization are presented and discussed. The quantities include acoustic energy, intensity and power flow as well as a practical measure, the sum of the squares of the signals from a number of sensors. Theoretical simulations and experimental implementations are used to evaluate sound field minimization techniques. The discussion and experiments are extended to the active reduction of structural vibrations.

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Published date: 1988
Organisations: University of Southampton

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Local EPrints ID: 52272
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/52272
PURE UUID: ac762cbc-cd8b-495b-9102-0e666201d271

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Date deposited: 26 Aug 2008
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:44

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