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Study and optimisation of the anaerobic acidogenic fermentation of two-phase olive pomace

Study and optimisation of the anaerobic acidogenic fermentation of two-phase olive pomace
Study and optimisation of the anaerobic acidogenic fermentation of two-phase olive pomace
A study of the effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the anaerobic acidogenic fermentation of two-phase olive pomace (TPOP) was carried out at laboratory-scale and mesophilic temperature (35 °C). The experimental results obtained demonstrated that the optimum value of HRT for the acidogenic fermentation process was 12 days, for which a maximum production of total volatile fatty acids (TVFA) and, specifically, of acetic and butyric acids were obtained. It was found that a multicomponent substrate removal kinetics model adjusted very well to the experimental data obtained. A second-order kinetic model was used for the degradation of non-soluble COD whilst a first-order model was appropriate for studying both the total and soluble COD reduction. The values of the kinetic constants obtained were: 0.29, 0.29 and 0.12 g COD/g VSS per day for non-soluble, total and soluble COD degradation, respectively. A similar model was used to determine the kinetic constants for product formation, obtaining values of: 0.0007, 0.0024, 0.0022, 0.0031 and 0.0022 g COD per litre per day for acetic, propionic, butyric, valeric+caproic and TVFA, respectively. The order of the reaction of volatile fatty acids production was determined in each case, the values being in the range of 1.7–2.4, values very close to second-order. The value of the apparent kinetic constant was minimum for acetic acid formation (0.0009 g COD per litre per day) and maximum for valeric+caproic acids (0.0031 g COD per litre per day) because in the hydrolysis process of complex organic matter, long chain fatty acids appear first and faster than acetic acid. The kinetic model used was validated by comparing the theoretical and experimental values of the product formation rate (RP). The small deviations obtained (in the range between 1.0 and 20.8%) suggest that the proposed model predicts the kinetics of volatile acids production accurately.
anaerobic acidogenic fermentation, optimisation, total volatile fatty acids (tvfa), kinetics, two-phase olive pomace
1359-5113
281-291
Borja, R.
ed513484-04ff-4424-ab79-dc715ca63146
Sánchez, E.
8c460625-8a86-4050-baf5-c0d018fcd770
Rincón, B.
d8fe6652-8ff6-4662-bfb7-3b231d140957
Raposo, F.
47104451-511a-4b03-aaa9-67348da4567d
Martin, M.A.
d4addce3-b868-4b23-a066-3c282e65eeaa
Martin, A.
169f0afa-12fc-43b5-a72d-7bfc493aa170
Borja, R.
ed513484-04ff-4424-ab79-dc715ca63146
Sánchez, E.
8c460625-8a86-4050-baf5-c0d018fcd770
Rincón, B.
d8fe6652-8ff6-4662-bfb7-3b231d140957
Raposo, F.
47104451-511a-4b03-aaa9-67348da4567d
Martin, M.A.
d4addce3-b868-4b23-a066-3c282e65eeaa
Martin, A.
169f0afa-12fc-43b5-a72d-7bfc493aa170

Borja, R., Sánchez, E., Rincón, B., Raposo, F., Martin, M.A. and Martin, A. (2004) Study and optimisation of the anaerobic acidogenic fermentation of two-phase olive pomace. Process Biochemistry, 40 (1), 281-291. (doi:10.1016/j.procbio.2004.01.002).

Record type: Article

Abstract

A study of the effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the anaerobic acidogenic fermentation of two-phase olive pomace (TPOP) was carried out at laboratory-scale and mesophilic temperature (35 °C). The experimental results obtained demonstrated that the optimum value of HRT for the acidogenic fermentation process was 12 days, for which a maximum production of total volatile fatty acids (TVFA) and, specifically, of acetic and butyric acids were obtained. It was found that a multicomponent substrate removal kinetics model adjusted very well to the experimental data obtained. A second-order kinetic model was used for the degradation of non-soluble COD whilst a first-order model was appropriate for studying both the total and soluble COD reduction. The values of the kinetic constants obtained were: 0.29, 0.29 and 0.12 g COD/g VSS per day for non-soluble, total and soluble COD degradation, respectively. A similar model was used to determine the kinetic constants for product formation, obtaining values of: 0.0007, 0.0024, 0.0022, 0.0031 and 0.0022 g COD per litre per day for acetic, propionic, butyric, valeric+caproic and TVFA, respectively. The order of the reaction of volatile fatty acids production was determined in each case, the values being in the range of 1.7–2.4, values very close to second-order. The value of the apparent kinetic constant was minimum for acetic acid formation (0.0009 g COD per litre per day) and maximum for valeric+caproic acids (0.0031 g COD per litre per day) because in the hydrolysis process of complex organic matter, long chain fatty acids appear first and faster than acetic acid. The kinetic model used was validated by comparing the theoretical and experimental values of the product formation rate (RP). The small deviations obtained (in the range between 1.0 and 20.8%) suggest that the proposed model predicts the kinetics of volatile acids production accurately.

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More information

Published date: January 2004
Keywords: anaerobic acidogenic fermentation, optimisation, total volatile fatty acids (tvfa), kinetics, two-phase olive pomace

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 53036
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/53036
ISSN: 1359-5113
PURE UUID: 492b98cd-9ee3-41b8-8dc5-853f3b0b7818

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Jul 2008
Last modified: 20 Dec 2018 17:31

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