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Sea-level rise: coastal impacts and responses

Sea-level rise: coastal impacts and responses
Sea-level rise: coastal impacts and responses
In the 1990s it was estimated that 21 and 37 per cent of the global population lived within 30 km and 100 km, respectively, of the coast (Cohen et al. 1997; Gommes et al. 1997). Population densities in coastal areas are three times the global mean, and it is estimated that 50% of the world’s population will live within 100 km of the coast by 2030 (Small and Nicholls, 2003). Human settlements, including many large cities, are also concentrated near or on coastlines, and a large proportion of global economic productivity derives from coastal areas (Turner et al., 1996). Trends towards urbanisation are likely to increase population densities in low-lying coastal areas; the population living within 30 km of the coast is estimated to be growing at twice the global average reflecting coastward migration, and GDP growth in coastal areas exceeds the national average in many countries (Bijlsma et al., 1996). Coastal zones are therefore of great importance as zones of settlement and play a vital role in the economic well-being of many nations.
393619114X
33-64
WBGU (German Advisory Council on Global Change)
Brooks, N.
2b13f624-ea4b-4b79-a8fc-3d974cca79b4
Nicholls, R. J.
4ce1e355-cc5d-4702-8124-820932c57076
Hall, J.
d4872b9c-4ab2-4d97-8c72-e6fccce23688
Schubert, R.
Schellnhuber, H.J.
Buchmann, N.
Epiny, A.
Greisshammer, R.
Kulessa, M.
Messner, D.
Rahmstorf, S.
Schmid, J.
Brooks, N.
2b13f624-ea4b-4b79-a8fc-3d974cca79b4
Nicholls, R. J.
4ce1e355-cc5d-4702-8124-820932c57076
Hall, J.
d4872b9c-4ab2-4d97-8c72-e6fccce23688
Schubert, R.
Schellnhuber, H.J.
Buchmann, N.
Epiny, A.
Greisshammer, R.
Kulessa, M.
Messner, D.
Rahmstorf, S.
Schmid, J.

Brooks, N., Nicholls, R. J. and Hall, J. (2006) Sea-level rise: coastal impacts and responses. In, Schubert, R., Schellnhuber, H.J., Buchmann, N., Epiny, A., Greisshammer, R., Kulessa, M., Messner, D., Rahmstorf, S. and Schmid, J. (eds.) The Future Oceans: Warming Up, Rising High, Turning Sour (Special Report). Berlin, Germany. WBGU (German Advisory Council on Global Change), pp. 33-64.

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

In the 1990s it was estimated that 21 and 37 per cent of the global population lived within 30 km and 100 km, respectively, of the coast (Cohen et al. 1997; Gommes et al. 1997). Population densities in coastal areas are three times the global mean, and it is estimated that 50% of the world’s population will live within 100 km of the coast by 2030 (Small and Nicholls, 2003). Human settlements, including many large cities, are also concentrated near or on coastlines, and a large proportion of global economic productivity derives from coastal areas (Turner et al., 1996). Trends towards urbanisation are likely to increase population densities in low-lying coastal areas; the population living within 30 km of the coast is estimated to be growing at twice the global average reflecting coastward migration, and GDP growth in coastal areas exceeds the national average in many countries (Bijlsma et al., 1996). Coastal zones are therefore of great importance as zones of settlement and play a vital role in the economic well-being of many nations.

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Published date: 2006

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 53198
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/53198
ISBN: 393619114X
PURE UUID: 675e094d-1a76-48c9-8859-a61d570eff63
ORCID for R. J. Nicholls: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9715-1109

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Jul 2008
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:43

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Contributors

Author: N. Brooks
Author: R. J. Nicholls ORCID iD
Author: J. Hall
Editor: R. Schubert
Editor: H.J. Schellnhuber
Editor: N. Buchmann
Editor: A. Epiny
Editor: R. Greisshammer
Editor: M. Kulessa
Editor: D. Messner
Editor: S. Rahmstorf
Editor: J. Schmid

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