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Acute and sub-lethal toxicity tests to monitor the impact of leachate on an aquatic environment

Acute and sub-lethal toxicity tests to monitor the impact of leachate on an aquatic environment
Acute and sub-lethal toxicity tests to monitor the impact of leachate on an aquatic environment
In this study, a specific landfill leachate (1200 mgl?1 COD and 600 mgl?1 BOD5) was used to develop a standardised short-term acute and longer-term sublethal ex-situ toxicity testing programme, in order to determine the potential ecological implications of leaching contaminants reaching the water table. Bioassays were undertaken with juvenile Gammarus pulex and Asellus aquaticus macro-invertebrates. Preliminary acute test variables included static and static renewed flow rates for 96-h, starved and fed specimens, and aerobic and oxygen depleting conditions. However, regardless of any test variable, the lethal concentration (LC50) for A. aquaticus remained at 12.3% v/v leachate in deionised water, whilst that for G. pulex was only 1%. Sublethal toxicity was judged on the basis of frequency of births and the growth rate of newly born individuals. Tests showed that even a dilution as high as 1:66- would influence the fecundity of a Gammarus population, whilst a dilution of 1:20 would affect the size of an Asellus breeding colony.
landfill leachate, toxicity testing, acute toxicity, sublethal toxicity, A. aquaticus, G. pulex
0160-4120
269-273
Bloor, M.C
63cefa75-282f-4329-b1f6-9ff480f6df99
Banks, C.J.
5c6c8c4b-5b25-4e37-9058-50fa8d2e926f
Krivtsov, V.
29aa1b20-e62f-408f-a417-d16771464f65
Bloor, M.C
63cefa75-282f-4329-b1f6-9ff480f6df99
Banks, C.J.
5c6c8c4b-5b25-4e37-9058-50fa8d2e926f
Krivtsov, V.
29aa1b20-e62f-408f-a417-d16771464f65

Bloor, M.C, Banks, C.J. and Krivtsov, V. (2005) Acute and sub-lethal toxicity tests to monitor the impact of leachate on an aquatic environment. Environment International, 31 (2), 269-273. (doi:10.1016/j.envint.2004.10.010).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In this study, a specific landfill leachate (1200 mgl?1 COD and 600 mgl?1 BOD5) was used to develop a standardised short-term acute and longer-term sublethal ex-situ toxicity testing programme, in order to determine the potential ecological implications of leaching contaminants reaching the water table. Bioassays were undertaken with juvenile Gammarus pulex and Asellus aquaticus macro-invertebrates. Preliminary acute test variables included static and static renewed flow rates for 96-h, starved and fed specimens, and aerobic and oxygen depleting conditions. However, regardless of any test variable, the lethal concentration (LC50) for A. aquaticus remained at 12.3% v/v leachate in deionised water, whilst that for G. pulex was only 1%. Sublethal toxicity was judged on the basis of frequency of births and the growth rate of newly born individuals. Tests showed that even a dilution as high as 1:66- would influence the fecundity of a Gammarus population, whilst a dilution of 1:20 would affect the size of an Asellus breeding colony.

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More information

Published date: February 2005
Keywords: landfill leachate, toxicity testing, acute toxicity, sublethal toxicity, A. aquaticus, G. pulex

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 53713
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/53713
ISSN: 0160-4120
PURE UUID: a0915c20-ae4b-46df-afb1-0a1f8f63f3f5

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Jul 2008
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:40

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