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Meiofauna in closed coastal saline lagoons in the United Kingdom: structure and biodiversity of the nematode assemblage

Meiofauna in closed coastal saline lagoons in the United Kingdom: structure and biodiversity of the nematode assemblage
Meiofauna in closed coastal saline lagoons in the United Kingdom: structure and biodiversity of the nematode assemblage
Coastal saline lagoons are rare in North West Europe and tend to be closed, brackish water systems. In
the United Kingdom they are small and isolated, each exhibiting extremely variable habitat conditions,
both spatially and temporally. This paper represents the first species-level study of lagoonal nematode
assemblages in the UK. Samples were taken from seven ponds in a saline lagoon system on the south
coast of England in order to describe the nematode assemblage in relation to habitat type and to assess
the possibility of lagoonal specialisation. At each site samples were also taken, or data were already
available, for salinity, sediment granulometry, sediment organic carbon content, photosynthetic
pigments and lagoon topography.
A lagoonal specialist nematode fauna was not identified, but it was found that the nematode communities
strongly reflected the differences between environmental conditions in the lagoons. Sample and
site diversity were found to be relatively similar, but the importance of habitat networks was indicated
by the relatively high system diversity, species turnover being highest between lagoons with different
salinity and/or granulometry regimes. Salinity was the principal factor correlated with assemblage
structure and species diversity was highest at the higher salinity sites. Median salinity (averaged from
weekly records over the previous 4 months) correlated more clearly with nematode assemblage structure
than salinity at the time of sampling. This shows the importance of considering historical as well as
contemporaneous data when undertaking ecological studies: Contemporary conditions may influence
species fecundity, and therefore relative abundances, whilst historic conditions may influence species
occurrence through the effects of recruitment and survival.
lagoon, brackish, saline, coastal, subtidal, benthos, maiofauna, nematode, biodiversity, species turnover
0272-7714
328-340
Barnes, N.
90c12ac3-3da3-470d-914c-0e5666369034
Bamber, R.N.
ff4433e4-3405-41f6-91a2-98bf98e981ae
Moncrieff, C.B.
889645c2-c1fb-43f6-8bb4-df054453eefe
Sheader, M.
fc6fc729-69bd-460d-846f-e2ba1c8e1b6b
Ferrero, T.J.
5fa7893a-8e1c-4641-97ac-c8250b04355c
Barnes, N.
90c12ac3-3da3-470d-914c-0e5666369034
Bamber, R.N.
ff4433e4-3405-41f6-91a2-98bf98e981ae
Moncrieff, C.B.
889645c2-c1fb-43f6-8bb4-df054453eefe
Sheader, M.
fc6fc729-69bd-460d-846f-e2ba1c8e1b6b
Ferrero, T.J.
5fa7893a-8e1c-4641-97ac-c8250b04355c

Barnes, N., Bamber, R.N., Moncrieff, C.B., Sheader, M. and Ferrero, T.J. (2008) Meiofauna in closed coastal saline lagoons in the United Kingdom: structure and biodiversity of the nematode assemblage. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 79 (2), 328-340. (doi:10.1016/j.ecss.2008.03.017).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Coastal saline lagoons are rare in North West Europe and tend to be closed, brackish water systems. In
the United Kingdom they are small and isolated, each exhibiting extremely variable habitat conditions,
both spatially and temporally. This paper represents the first species-level study of lagoonal nematode
assemblages in the UK. Samples were taken from seven ponds in a saline lagoon system on the south
coast of England in order to describe the nematode assemblage in relation to habitat type and to assess
the possibility of lagoonal specialisation. At each site samples were also taken, or data were already
available, for salinity, sediment granulometry, sediment organic carbon content, photosynthetic
pigments and lagoon topography.
A lagoonal specialist nematode fauna was not identified, but it was found that the nematode communities
strongly reflected the differences between environmental conditions in the lagoons. Sample and
site diversity were found to be relatively similar, but the importance of habitat networks was indicated
by the relatively high system diversity, species turnover being highest between lagoons with different
salinity and/or granulometry regimes. Salinity was the principal factor correlated with assemblage
structure and species diversity was highest at the higher salinity sites. Median salinity (averaged from
weekly records over the previous 4 months) correlated more clearly with nematode assemblage structure
than salinity at the time of sampling. This shows the importance of considering historical as well as
contemporaneous data when undertaking ecological studies: Contemporary conditions may influence
species fecundity, and therefore relative abundances, whilst historic conditions may influence species
occurrence through the effects of recruitment and survival.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Submitted date: 9 October 2007
Published date: 1 April 2008
Keywords: lagoon, brackish, saline, coastal, subtidal, benthos, maiofauna, nematode, biodiversity, species turnover

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 54097
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/54097
ISSN: 0272-7714
PURE UUID: 8d31e7d9-c6a0-4033-a0e7-4d14413c066f

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Jul 2008
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:39

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Contributors

Author: N. Barnes
Author: R.N. Bamber
Author: C.B. Moncrieff
Author: M. Sheader
Author: T.J. Ferrero

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