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Nanoporous solids as receptacles and catalysts for unusual conversions of organic compounds

Nanoporous solids as receptacles and catalysts for unusual conversions of organic compounds
Nanoporous solids as receptacles and catalysts for unusual conversions of organic compounds
Solid-state chemical principles, allied to a degree of chemical intuition, enables one to design open-structure solids on to the inner surfaces of which isolated catalytically active sites of different kinds may be placed. With such solids, which act simultaneously both as permeable catalysts and reaction vessels, a number of highly desirable chemical conversions—many of paramount importance in the context of “green” chemistry and clean technology—may be smoothly effected under environmentally benign conditions. Typical examples, illustrated here, include the selective oxidation of toluene to benzaldehyde, current methods of producing alcohols, aldehydes and acids, and the synthesis of -caprolactam in a by-product-free manner. Such open-structure solids, which house single-site active centres, are also readily amenable to detailed and precise structural elucidation.
design, x-ray-absorption, oxidation of, nylon-6, "green" chemistry, elucidation, cyclohexanone, oxidation, active-sites, alcohols, polymer recycling, in-situ, single-site heterogeneous catalysts, epoxidation catalysts, microporous aluminophosphates
1293-2558
326-331
Raja, R.
74faf442-38a6-4ac1-84f9-b3c039cb392b
Thomas, J.M.
98879775-7bc8-4aeb-89c1-da6c60c856c2
Raja, R.
74faf442-38a6-4ac1-84f9-b3c039cb392b
Thomas, J.M.
98879775-7bc8-4aeb-89c1-da6c60c856c2

Raja, R. and Thomas, J.M. (2006) Nanoporous solids as receptacles and catalysts for unusual conversions of organic compounds. Solid State Sciences, 8 (3-4), 326-331. (doi:10.1016/j.solidstatesciences.2006.02.010).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Solid-state chemical principles, allied to a degree of chemical intuition, enables one to design open-structure solids on to the inner surfaces of which isolated catalytically active sites of different kinds may be placed. With such solids, which act simultaneously both as permeable catalysts and reaction vessels, a number of highly desirable chemical conversions—many of paramount importance in the context of “green” chemistry and clean technology—may be smoothly effected under environmentally benign conditions. Typical examples, illustrated here, include the selective oxidation of toluene to benzaldehyde, current methods of producing alcohols, aldehydes and acids, and the synthesis of -caprolactam in a by-product-free manner. Such open-structure solids, which house single-site active centres, are also readily amenable to detailed and precise structural elucidation.

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More information

Published date: February 2006
Keywords: design, x-ray-absorption, oxidation of, nylon-6, "green" chemistry, elucidation, cyclohexanone, oxidation, active-sites, alcohols, polymer recycling, in-situ, single-site heterogeneous catalysts, epoxidation catalysts, microporous aluminophosphates

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 54219
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/54219
ISSN: 1293-2558
PURE UUID: 95f1d57c-9433-4665-904d-bbefd48e7b65
ORCID for R. Raja: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4161-7053

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 31 Jul 2008
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:46

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