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A comparison of bilateral versus unilateral target and distractor presentation in the Remote Distractor Paradigm

A comparison of bilateral versus unilateral target and distractor presentation in the Remote Distractor Paradigm
A comparison of bilateral versus unilateral target and distractor presentation in the Remote Distractor Paradigm
The Remote Distractor Effect (RDE) is a robust finding of an increase in saccade onset latencies (20-40ms) when a distractor is presented simultaneously with a target, compared to when a target is presented on its own (Walker, Deubel, Schneider, & Findlay, 1997). Distractors presented at fixation produce the largest RDE and the effect decreases as distractors are moved into the periphery. Data from two experiments that contrast with these standard findings are reported. Under bilateral target presentation, larger RDE magnitudes occurred for peripheral than for central distractors, whereas under unilateral presentation, the pattern reversed. The findings are discussed with reference to discrimination processes, attentional factors and current models of oculomotor control. It is suggested that in bilateral target presentation the competition between the distractor and the target results in the programming of a saccade to the distractor, as well as a saccade to the target. Time taken to cancel the saccade to the distractor produces the increased saccade latency for peripheral distractors in that condition.
remote distractor effect (rde), discrimination and decision processes
1618-3169
334-341
Benson, Valerie
4827cede-6668-4e3d-bded-ade4cd5e5db5
Benson, Valerie
4827cede-6668-4e3d-bded-ade4cd5e5db5

Benson, Valerie (2008) A comparison of bilateral versus unilateral target and distractor presentation in the Remote Distractor Paradigm. Experimental Psychology, 55 (5), 334-341. (doi:10.1027/1618-3169.55.5.334).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The Remote Distractor Effect (RDE) is a robust finding of an increase in saccade onset latencies (20-40ms) when a distractor is presented simultaneously with a target, compared to when a target is presented on its own (Walker, Deubel, Schneider, & Findlay, 1997). Distractors presented at fixation produce the largest RDE and the effect decreases as distractors are moved into the periphery. Data from two experiments that contrast with these standard findings are reported. Under bilateral target presentation, larger RDE magnitudes occurred for peripheral than for central distractors, whereas under unilateral presentation, the pattern reversed. The findings are discussed with reference to discrimination processes, attentional factors and current models of oculomotor control. It is suggested that in bilateral target presentation the competition between the distractor and the target results in the programming of a saccade to the distractor, as well as a saccade to the target. Time taken to cancel the saccade to the distractor produces the increased saccade latency for peripheral distractors in that condition.

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More information

Published date: March 2008
Keywords: remote distractor effect (rde), discrimination and decision processes

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 54863
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/54863
ISSN: 1618-3169
PURE UUID: d9ffcc08-f21f-4533-8f95-15b19b283198

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Date deposited: 04 Aug 2008
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:38

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Contributors

Author: Valerie Benson

University divisions

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