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Phenomenological evidence for two types of paranoia

Phenomenological evidence for two types of paranoia
Phenomenological evidence for two types of paranoia
Two types of paranoia have been identified, namely persecution (or 'Poor Me') paranoia, and punishment (or 'Bad Me') paranoia. This research tests predicted differences in phenomenology - specifically, in person evaluative beliefs, self-esteem, depression, anxiety, and anger. Method: Fifty-three people with current paranoid beliefs were classified as Poor Me, Bad Me, or neither (classification was reliable). Key dependent variables were measured. Results: All predictions were supported, except the one relating to anger, where the two groups did not differ. The Bad Me group had lower self-esteem, more negative self-evaluative thinking, lower negative evaluations about others, higher depression and anxiety. Importantly, the differences in self-esteem and self-evaluations were not fully accounted for by differences in depression. Conclusion: Data support the presence of two distinct topographies of paranoia. Future research is needed to explore the theory further and examine clinical implications.
0254-4962
327-333
Chadwick, P.D.J.
f34dca6a-6506-4c68-98fe-ee9fd7474872
Trower, P.
2b228ad7-508d-47bb-9f34-73d4109de35a
Juusti-Butler, T.M.
77637fd5-6fb6-4fc6-8d85-86616402a4eb
Maguire, N.
ebc88e0a-3c1e-4b3a-88ac-e1dad740011b
Chadwick, P.D.J.
f34dca6a-6506-4c68-98fe-ee9fd7474872
Trower, P.
2b228ad7-508d-47bb-9f34-73d4109de35a
Juusti-Butler, T.M.
77637fd5-6fb6-4fc6-8d85-86616402a4eb
Maguire, N.
ebc88e0a-3c1e-4b3a-88ac-e1dad740011b

Chadwick, P.D.J., Trower, P., Juusti-Butler, T.M. and Maguire, N. (2005) Phenomenological evidence for two types of paranoia. Psychopathology, 38 (6), 327-333. (doi:10.1159/000089453).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Two types of paranoia have been identified, namely persecution (or 'Poor Me') paranoia, and punishment (or 'Bad Me') paranoia. This research tests predicted differences in phenomenology - specifically, in person evaluative beliefs, self-esteem, depression, anxiety, and anger. Method: Fifty-three people with current paranoid beliefs were classified as Poor Me, Bad Me, or neither (classification was reliable). Key dependent variables were measured. Results: All predictions were supported, except the one relating to anger, where the two groups did not differ. The Bad Me group had lower self-esteem, more negative self-evaluative thinking, lower negative evaluations about others, higher depression and anxiety. Importantly, the differences in self-esteem and self-evaluations were not fully accounted for by differences in depression. Conclusion: Data support the presence of two distinct topographies of paranoia. Future research is needed to explore the theory further and examine clinical implications.

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Published date: 2005

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 55371
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/55371
ISSN: 0254-4962
PURE UUID: 70795df3-7eb1-47c2-bb44-4e4f0d8d3c82
ORCID for N. Maguire: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4295-8068

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Date deposited: 30 Jul 2008
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:53

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Contributors

Author: P.D.J. Chadwick
Author: P. Trower
Author: T.M. Juusti-Butler
Author: N. Maguire ORCID iD

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