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Social inequality and ethnic differences in smoking in New Zealand

Social inequality and ethnic differences in smoking in New Zealand
Social inequality and ethnic differences in smoking in New Zealand
This study tests a generalisation of the ‘Wilkinson’ thesis that the greater a nation’s income inequality, the poorer the average national health status. We consider the effect of socio-economic inequality upon ethnic variations in smoking in New Zealand. Analysis of Maori and Pakeha (New Zealanders of European descent) smoking rates from the 1996 Census is conducted for 73 Territorial Local Authority areas in New Zealand, disaggregated by gender and rural–urban location. Partial correlation is used to control for absolute levels of deprivation and examine the independent effect of ethnic social inequality upon smoking rates. The level of social inequality between Maori and Pakeha has an independent effect on Maori smoking rates. Pakeha smoking rates by contrast are more sensitive to variations inabsolute rather than relative deprivation. The effect of inequality is greatest for Maori women, especially among urban residents. By contrast, among Maori men the effects are greatest in rural areas. The results provide some qualified support for the Wilkinson thesis and suggest that policies which address fundamental issues of social inequality will play a small, but significant, role in helping to reduce high smoking rates amongst Maori.
ethnic inequality, smoking, maori, New Zealand
0277-9536
129-143
Barnett, R.
27cdcf63-273b-4592-98f8-c06d68d41682
Moon, G.
68cffc4d-72c1-41e9-b1fa-1570c5f3a0b4
Kearns, R.
7d99ad34-40c2-4821-ad7b-7078260900d4
Barnett, R.
27cdcf63-273b-4592-98f8-c06d68d41682
Moon, G.
68cffc4d-72c1-41e9-b1fa-1570c5f3a0b4
Kearns, R.
7d99ad34-40c2-4821-ad7b-7078260900d4

Barnett, R., Moon, G. and Kearns, R. (2004) Social inequality and ethnic differences in smoking in New Zealand. Social Science & Medicine, 59 (1), 129-143. (doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2003.10.010).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This study tests a generalisation of the ‘Wilkinson’ thesis that the greater a nation’s income inequality, the poorer the average national health status. We consider the effect of socio-economic inequality upon ethnic variations in smoking in New Zealand. Analysis of Maori and Pakeha (New Zealanders of European descent) smoking rates from the 1996 Census is conducted for 73 Territorial Local Authority areas in New Zealand, disaggregated by gender and rural–urban location. Partial correlation is used to control for absolute levels of deprivation and examine the independent effect of ethnic social inequality upon smoking rates. The level of social inequality between Maori and Pakeha has an independent effect on Maori smoking rates. Pakeha smoking rates by contrast are more sensitive to variations inabsolute rather than relative deprivation. The effect of inequality is greatest for Maori women, especially among urban residents. By contrast, among Maori men the effects are greatest in rural areas. The results provide some qualified support for the Wilkinson thesis and suggest that policies which address fundamental issues of social inequality will play a small, but significant, role in helping to reduce high smoking rates amongst Maori.

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More information

Published date: July 2004
Keywords: ethnic inequality, smoking, maori, New Zealand
Organisations: Economy Culture & Space, PHEW – P (Population Health)

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 55397
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/55397
ISSN: 0277-9536
PURE UUID: 920514d7-63ae-40cd-8397-35cbf968e2fe
ORCID for G. Moon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7256-8397

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 31 Jul 2008
Last modified: 19 Jun 2021 01:40

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Contributors

Author: R. Barnett
Author: G. Moon ORCID iD
Author: R. Kearns

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