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Towards a general explanation for the survival of the private asylum

Record type: Article

Taken together, the ascendancy of community care and the dominant role of the state as a funder of services have meant that private sector residential care for people with mental health problems is now a rarity in most countries. Yet private asylums have persisted in some places. The authors propose an analytical framework for understanding such `institutional survivals'. This frame- work problematises the public ^ private and community ^ asylum boundaries that have hitherto been taken for granted. The framework is applied to case studies in Canada and New Zealand. Survival of these institutions is found to be centrally associated with accommodations with legislative environments, proactive innovation, and the availability of markets.

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Citation

Moon, G., Joseph, A.E. and Kearns, R. (2005) Towards a general explanation for the survival of the private asylum Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, 23, (2), 159 -172. (doi:10.1068/c15r).

More information

Published date: 2005
Organisations: Economy Culture & Space, PHEW – C (Care)

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 55406
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/55406
ISSN: 0263-774X
PURE UUID: 95c4c344-7b71-4546-9bd4-e2ca123c154a
ORCID for G. Moon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7256-8397

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 31 Jul 2008
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 14:33

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