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Affective priming of semantic categorisation responses

Affective priming of semantic categorisation responses
Affective priming of semantic categorisation responses
Fazio, Sanbonmatsu Powell, & Kardes, (1986) demonstrated that less time is needed to affectively categorise a target as positive or negative when it is preceded by a prime with the same valence (e.g., summer-honest) compared to when the target is preceded by a prime with a different valence (e.g., cancer-honest). Such effects could be due to spreading of activation within a semantic network and/or to Stroop-like response conflicts. If a spreading of activation mechanism operates in priming tasks, primes should also facilitate nonaffective semantic processing of affectively congruent targets. In Experiment 1, we failed to observe affective priming when participants responded on the basis of whether the target referred to a person or animal. Experiment 2 revealed significant affective priming when participants responded on the basis of the valence of the targets but not when the semantic category of the targets (person or object) was relevant, despite the fact that apart from the task, both conditions were identical. The present results suggest that affective priming in the affective categorisation task is primarily due to the operation of a Stroop-like response conflict mechanism.
0269-9931
643-666
De Houwer, Jan.
38b6ce1b-80bf-4fa7-9a8a-0d57881f2795
Hermans, Dirk.
b96ecf15-956c-4037-a931-19f8aac8c09c
Rothermund, Klaus.
269ed301-daeb-4255-85e2-84f14d448d7a
Wentura, Dirk.
fb1d8aef-ccf0-4868-b9b9-de2a6afd69c7
De Houwer, Jan.
38b6ce1b-80bf-4fa7-9a8a-0d57881f2795
Hermans, Dirk.
b96ecf15-956c-4037-a931-19f8aac8c09c
Rothermund, Klaus.
269ed301-daeb-4255-85e2-84f14d448d7a
Wentura, Dirk.
fb1d8aef-ccf0-4868-b9b9-de2a6afd69c7

De Houwer, Jan., Hermans, Dirk., Rothermund, Klaus. and Wentura, Dirk. (2002) Affective priming of semantic categorisation responses. Cognition and Emotion, 16 (5), 643-666. (doi:10.1080/02699930143000419).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Fazio, Sanbonmatsu Powell, & Kardes, (1986) demonstrated that less time is needed to affectively categorise a target as positive or negative when it is preceded by a prime with the same valence (e.g., summer-honest) compared to when the target is preceded by a prime with a different valence (e.g., cancer-honest). Such effects could be due to spreading of activation within a semantic network and/or to Stroop-like response conflicts. If a spreading of activation mechanism operates in priming tasks, primes should also facilitate nonaffective semantic processing of affectively congruent targets. In Experiment 1, we failed to observe affective priming when participants responded on the basis of whether the target referred to a person or animal. Experiment 2 revealed significant affective priming when participants responded on the basis of the valence of the targets but not when the semantic category of the targets (person or object) was relevant, despite the fact that apart from the task, both conditions were identical. The present results suggest that affective priming in the affective categorisation task is primarily due to the operation of a Stroop-like response conflict mechanism.

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Published date: August 2002

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 55491
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/55491
ISSN: 0269-9931
PURE UUID: 741c0122-8eee-4d18-a62e-f9cd0f53edcd

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Date deposited: 31 Jul 2008
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:36

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