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On the generality of the affective Simon effect

On the generality of the affective Simon effect
On the generality of the affective Simon effect
In affective Simon studies, participants are to select between a positive and negative response on the basis of a nonaffective stimulus feature (i.e., relevant stimulus feature) while ignoring the valence of the presented stimuli (i.e., irrelevant stimulus feature). De Houwer and Eelen (1998) showed that the time to select the correct response is influenced by the match between the valence of the response and the (irrelevant) valence of the stimulus. In the affective Simon studies that have been reported until now, only words were used as stimuli and the relevant stimulus feature was always the grammatical category of the words. We report four experiments in which we examined the generality of the affective Simon effect. Significant affective Simon effects were found when the semantic category, grammatical category, and letter-case of words was relevant, when the semantic category of photographed objects was relevant, and when participants were asked to give nonverbal approach or avoidance responses on the basis of the grammatical category of words. Results also showed that the magnitude of the affective Simon effect depended on the nature of the relevant feature.
0269-9931
189-206
De Houwer, Jan.
38b6ce1b-80bf-4fa7-9a8a-0d57881f2795
Crombez, Geert.
704e24df-10a6-4808-81ae-8ad87d8b8569
Baeyens, Frank.
2ee7b9a4-966a-4c71-9fdb-3a2742a349e5
Hermans, Dirk.
b96ecf15-956c-4037-a931-19f8aac8c09c
De Houwer, Jan.
38b6ce1b-80bf-4fa7-9a8a-0d57881f2795
Crombez, Geert.
704e24df-10a6-4808-81ae-8ad87d8b8569
Baeyens, Frank.
2ee7b9a4-966a-4c71-9fdb-3a2742a349e5
Hermans, Dirk.
b96ecf15-956c-4037-a931-19f8aac8c09c

De Houwer, Jan., Crombez, Geert., Baeyens, Frank. and Hermans, Dirk. (2001) On the generality of the affective Simon effect. Cognition and Emotion, 15 (2), 189-206. (doi:10.1080/02699930125883).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In affective Simon studies, participants are to select between a positive and negative response on the basis of a nonaffective stimulus feature (i.e., relevant stimulus feature) while ignoring the valence of the presented stimuli (i.e., irrelevant stimulus feature). De Houwer and Eelen (1998) showed that the time to select the correct response is influenced by the match between the valence of the response and the (irrelevant) valence of the stimulus. In the affective Simon studies that have been reported until now, only words were used as stimuli and the relevant stimulus feature was always the grammatical category of the words. We report four experiments in which we examined the generality of the affective Simon effect. Significant affective Simon effects were found when the semantic category, grammatical category, and letter-case of words was relevant, when the semantic category of photographed objects was relevant, and when participants were asked to give nonverbal approach or avoidance responses on the basis of the grammatical category of words. Results also showed that the magnitude of the affective Simon effect depended on the nature of the relevant feature.

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Published date: March 2001

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Local EPrints ID: 55510
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/55510
ISSN: 0269-9931
PURE UUID: 81a40cec-b2ea-4723-8668-b9244f3306ab

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Date deposited: 31 Jul 2008
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:36

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Contributors

Author: Jan. De Houwer
Author: Geert. Crombez
Author: Frank. Baeyens
Author: Dirk. Hermans

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