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Divergent selection during speciation of Lake Malawi cichlid fishes inferred from parallel radiations in nuptial coloration

Divergent selection during speciation of Lake Malawi cichlid fishes inferred from parallel radiations in nuptial coloration
Divergent selection during speciation of Lake Malawi cichlid fishes inferred from parallel radiations in nuptial coloration
Repeated evolution of the same phenotypic difference during independent episodes of speciation is strong evidence for selection during speciation. More than 1,000 species of cichlids, >10% of the world's freshwater fish species, have arisen within the past million years in Lakes Malawi and Victoria in eastern Africa. Many pairs of closely related sympatric species differ in their nuptial coloration in very similar ways. Nuptial coloration is important in their mate choice, and speciation by sexual selection on genetically or ecologically constrained variation in nuptial coloration had been proposed, which would repeatedly produce similar nuptial types in different populations, a prediction that was difficult to test in the absence of population-level phylogenies. We measured genetic similarity between individuals within and between populations, species, and lake regions by typing 59 individuals at >2,000 polymorphic genetic loci. From these data, we reconstructed, to our knowledge, the first larger species level phylogeny for the most diverse group of Lake Malawi cichlids. We used the genetic and phylogenetic data to test the divergent selection scenario against colonization, character displacement, and hybridization scenarios that could also explain diverse communities. Diversity has arisen by replicated radiations into the same color types, resulting in phenotypically very different, yet closely related, species within and phenotypically highly similar yet unrelated sets of species between regions, which is consistent with divergent selection during speciation and is inconsistent with colonization and character displacement models.
0027-8424
14074-14079
Allender, Charlotte J.
b2b2e25c-6ece-4404-b155-04d8786e1925
Seehausen, Ole
143a684d-3615-475d-af6f-d48a6a8d4f8d
Knight, Mairi E.
5cefdefd-3be8-4313-ba61-8b558a8f8778
Turner, George F.
7bcbe166-d7cf-479f-938a-42fa623949e0
Maclean, Norman
cb0429bd-9dbc-48e7-b5b5-f429b63e6ad8
Allender, Charlotte J.
b2b2e25c-6ece-4404-b155-04d8786e1925
Seehausen, Ole
143a684d-3615-475d-af6f-d48a6a8d4f8d
Knight, Mairi E.
5cefdefd-3be8-4313-ba61-8b558a8f8778
Turner, George F.
7bcbe166-d7cf-479f-938a-42fa623949e0
Maclean, Norman
cb0429bd-9dbc-48e7-b5b5-f429b63e6ad8

Allender, Charlotte J., Seehausen, Ole, Knight, Mairi E., Turner, George F. and Maclean, Norman (2003) Divergent selection during speciation of Lake Malawi cichlid fishes inferred from parallel radiations in nuptial coloration. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 100 (24), 14074-14079. (doi:10.1073/pnas.2332665100).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Repeated evolution of the same phenotypic difference during independent episodes of speciation is strong evidence for selection during speciation. More than 1,000 species of cichlids, >10% of the world's freshwater fish species, have arisen within the past million years in Lakes Malawi and Victoria in eastern Africa. Many pairs of closely related sympatric species differ in their nuptial coloration in very similar ways. Nuptial coloration is important in their mate choice, and speciation by sexual selection on genetically or ecologically constrained variation in nuptial coloration had been proposed, which would repeatedly produce similar nuptial types in different populations, a prediction that was difficult to test in the absence of population-level phylogenies. We measured genetic similarity between individuals within and between populations, species, and lake regions by typing 59 individuals at >2,000 polymorphic genetic loci. From these data, we reconstructed, to our knowledge, the first larger species level phylogeny for the most diverse group of Lake Malawi cichlids. We used the genetic and phylogenetic data to test the divergent selection scenario against colonization, character displacement, and hybridization scenarios that could also explain diverse communities. Diversity has arisen by replicated radiations into the same color types, resulting in phenotypically very different, yet closely related, species within and phenotypically highly similar yet unrelated sets of species between regions, which is consistent with divergent selection during speciation and is inconsistent with colonization and character displacement models.

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More information

Submitted date: 5 May 2003
Published date: 25 November 2003
Organisations: Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 55780
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/55780
ISSN: 0027-8424
PURE UUID: 9470b563-34a2-44a1-8fbd-52c9a853be4c

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Date deposited: 06 Aug 2008
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:36

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