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Discrete location models for internet content distribution

Discrete location models for internet content distribution
Discrete location models for internet content distribution
Content Distribution Networks (CDN) have emerged as a new technology to overcome the problems due to the fast growth of the web-related traffic on the Internet, such as slow response times and heavy server loads. These networks maintain a number of proxy servers throughout the Internet, which totally or partially replicate the content of the main server and serve a set of clients. Thus, latency perceived by the clients and the total traffic flowing on the Internet is reduced. In a CDN, one has to decide on where to place the proxies among a given set of potential sites, which clients should be assigned to the installed proxies and which content should each proxy hold. In this research, we first review the existing models used for content distribution, such as the classical p-median and facility location models. We then argue why these models are not always adequate for a CDN and propose a novel binary integer programming model that takes into account all the decisions simultaneously. Two types of heuristics, namely a greedy and a Lagrangean type, to solve the model are described. Computational results of the heuristics on randomly generated Internet topologies are also presented.
content distribution network, integer programming, lagrangean relaxation
Bektas, T.
0db10084-e51c-41e5-a3c6-417e0d08dac9
Oguz, O.
7a6b6f2e-59fc-4b28-aa31-465a44468523
Bektas, T.
0db10084-e51c-41e5-a3c6-417e0d08dac9
Oguz, O.
7a6b6f2e-59fc-4b28-aa31-465a44468523

Bektas, T. and Oguz, O. (2005) Discrete location models for internet content distribution. Optimisation 2004. 25 - 28 Jul 2004.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Content Distribution Networks (CDN) have emerged as a new technology to overcome the problems due to the fast growth of the web-related traffic on the Internet, such as slow response times and heavy server loads. These networks maintain a number of proxy servers throughout the Internet, which totally or partially replicate the content of the main server and serve a set of clients. Thus, latency perceived by the clients and the total traffic flowing on the Internet is reduced. In a CDN, one has to decide on where to place the proxies among a given set of potential sites, which clients should be assigned to the installed proxies and which content should each proxy hold. In this research, we first review the existing models used for content distribution, such as the classical p-median and facility location models. We then argue why these models are not always adequate for a CDN and propose a novel binary integer programming model that takes into account all the decisions simultaneously. Two types of heuristics, namely a greedy and a Lagrangean type, to solve the model are described. Computational results of the heuristics on randomly generated Internet topologies are also presented.

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More information

Published date: 2005
Venue - Dates: Optimisation 2004, 2004-07-25 - 2004-07-28
Keywords: content distribution network, integer programming, lagrangean relaxation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 55814
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/55814
PURE UUID: fdc04714-8089-43ab-a788-671ea4ab642e
ORCID for T. Bektas: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0634-144X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Aug 2008
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:39

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