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Effects of Bt maize-fed prey on the generalist predator Poecilus cupretis L. (Coleoptera : Carabidae)

Effects of Bt maize-fed prey on the generalist predator Poecilus cupretis L. (Coleoptera : Carabidae)
Effects of Bt maize-fed prey on the generalist predator Poecilus cupretis L. (Coleoptera : Carabidae)
We investigated the effects of transgenic maize (Zea mays) expressing Bacillus thuringienses toxin (Bt maize) on larval and adult Poecilus cupreus carabid beetles in laboratory studies. In no-choice trials, neonate P. cupreus larvae were fed exclusively with Spodoptera littoralis caterpillars, which had been raised on Bt maize. S. littoralis raised on conventional maize or ldquohigh qualityrdquo Calliphora sp. pupae were fed to the beetle larvae in two control treatments. Bt-maize-fed caterpillar prey increased mortality to 100 within 40thinspdays. The experiment was repeated with 10-day-old beetle larvae. Bt treatment resulted in fewer pupae than in both controls, and in a higher mortality than in the Calliphora control. S. littoralis was suitable as exclusive prey in no-choice tests, at least for 40thinspdays, although prey quality seemed to be low compared to Calliphora pupae. The observed effects are most likely indirect effects due to further reduced nutritional prey quality. However, direct effects cannot be excluded. In the second part of the study, exposure of P. cupreus to Bt intoxicated prey was examined in paired-choice tests. Adult beetles were offered a choice between different prey conditions (frozen and thawed, freshly killed or living), prey types (S. littoralis caterpillars, Calliphorasp. pupae, cereal aphids) and prey treatments (raised on Bt or conventional maize). Living prey was preferred to frozen and dead prey. Caterpillars were only preferred to fly pupae and aphids when living. Prey treatment seemed to be least important for prey selection. The tests showed that P. cupreus ingested caterpillars readily and there was no evidence of them avoiding Bt containing prey, which means exposure in the field could occur. The presented protocols are a first step towards ecological risk assessment for carabid beetles.
bacillus thuringiensis, Cry1A(b), non-target effects, spodoptera littoralis, transgenic maize, tritrophic interactions
0962-8819
123-132
Meissle, M.
d2730263-8748-4a1a-bff5-0d446fc0a22e
Vojtech, E.
5527d763-9610-4305-bdfb-82da7c50d206
Poppy, G.M.
e18524cf-10ae-4ab4-b50c-e73e7d841389
Meissle, M.
d2730263-8748-4a1a-bff5-0d446fc0a22e
Vojtech, E.
5527d763-9610-4305-bdfb-82da7c50d206
Poppy, G.M.
e18524cf-10ae-4ab4-b50c-e73e7d841389

Meissle, M., Vojtech, E. and Poppy, G.M. (2005) Effects of Bt maize-fed prey on the generalist predator Poecilus cupretis L. (Coleoptera : Carabidae). Transgenic Research, 14 (2), 123-132. (doi:10.1007/s11248-004-6458-4).

Record type: Article

Abstract

We investigated the effects of transgenic maize (Zea mays) expressing Bacillus thuringienses toxin (Bt maize) on larval and adult Poecilus cupreus carabid beetles in laboratory studies. In no-choice trials, neonate P. cupreus larvae were fed exclusively with Spodoptera littoralis caterpillars, which had been raised on Bt maize. S. littoralis raised on conventional maize or ldquohigh qualityrdquo Calliphora sp. pupae were fed to the beetle larvae in two control treatments. Bt-maize-fed caterpillar prey increased mortality to 100 within 40thinspdays. The experiment was repeated with 10-day-old beetle larvae. Bt treatment resulted in fewer pupae than in both controls, and in a higher mortality than in the Calliphora control. S. littoralis was suitable as exclusive prey in no-choice tests, at least for 40thinspdays, although prey quality seemed to be low compared to Calliphora pupae. The observed effects are most likely indirect effects due to further reduced nutritional prey quality. However, direct effects cannot be excluded. In the second part of the study, exposure of P. cupreus to Bt intoxicated prey was examined in paired-choice tests. Adult beetles were offered a choice between different prey conditions (frozen and thawed, freshly killed or living), prey types (S. littoralis caterpillars, Calliphorasp. pupae, cereal aphids) and prey treatments (raised on Bt or conventional maize). Living prey was preferred to frozen and dead prey. Caterpillars were only preferred to fly pupae and aphids when living. Prey treatment seemed to be least important for prey selection. The tests showed that P. cupreus ingested caterpillars readily and there was no evidence of them avoiding Bt containing prey, which means exposure in the field could occur. The presented protocols are a first step towards ecological risk assessment for carabid beetles.

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More information

Published date: 1 April 2005
Keywords: bacillus thuringiensis, Cry1A(b), non-target effects, spodoptera littoralis, transgenic maize, tritrophic interactions

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 55888
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/55888
ISSN: 0962-8819
PURE UUID: a00f6efd-0e68-4392-bf64-e7bcf2d08b46

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Aug 2008
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:35

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