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Growth, productivity, and competitiveness of introgressed weedy Brassica rapa hybrids selected for the presence of Bt cry1Ac and gfp transgenes

Growth, productivity, and competitiveness of introgressed weedy Brassica rapa hybrids selected for the presence of Bt cry1Ac and gfp transgenes
Growth, productivity, and competitiveness of introgressed weedy Brassica rapa hybrids selected for the presence of Bt cry1Ac and gfp transgenes
Concerns exist that transgenic crop × weed hybrid populations will be more vigorous and competitive with crops compared with the parental weed species. Hydroponic, glasshouse, and field experiments were performed to evaluate the effects of introgression of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) cry1Ac and green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenes on hybrid productivity and competitiveness in four experimental Brassica rapa × transgenic Brassica napus hybrid generations (F1, BC1F1, BC2F1 and BC2F2). The average vegetative growth and nitrogen (N) use efficiency of transgenic hybrid generations grown under high N hydroponic conditions were lower than that of the weed parent (Brassica rapa, AA, 2n = 20), but similar to the transgenic crop parent, oilseed rape (Brassica napus, AACC, 2n = 38). No generational differences were detected under low N conditions. In two noncompetitive glasshouse experiments, both transgenic and nontransgenic BC2F2 hybrids had on average less vegetative growth and seed production than B. rapa. In two high intraspecific competition field experiments with varied herbivore pressure, BC2F2 hybrids produced less vegetative dry weight than B. rapa. The competitive ability of transgenic and nontransgenic BC2F2 hybrids against a neighbouring crop species were quantified in competition experiments that assayed wheat (Triticum aestivum) yield reductions under agronomic field conditions. The hybrids were the least competitive with wheat compared with parental Brassica competitors, although differences between transgenic and nontransgenic hybrids varied with location. Hybridization, with or without transgene introgression, resulted in less productive and competitive populations.
Bacillus thuringiensis, Brassica napus, Brassica rapa, hybridization, insect resistance, introgression
0962-1083
3177-3189
Halfhill, M.D.
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Sutherland, J.P.
de9d4131-4f66-40ef-bb60-1afc7a5a31c0
Moon, H.S.
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Poppy, G.M.
e18524cf-10ae-4ab4-b50c-e73e7d841389
Warwick, S.I.
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Weissinger, A.K.
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Rufty, T.W.
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Raymer, P.L.
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Stewart, C.N.
ed3b6e73-62b7-4a21-a202-58b6277c8e7c
Halfhill, M.D.
f895df31-c2d6-48ab-9de9-8118f51d4fae
Sutherland, J.P.
de9d4131-4f66-40ef-bb60-1afc7a5a31c0
Moon, H.S.
d3a20d21-1e13-4e78-b4ca-a31fdfb69526
Poppy, G.M.
e18524cf-10ae-4ab4-b50c-e73e7d841389
Warwick, S.I.
1c3834de-ad42-443d-986f-e1d9ad9bebcf
Weissinger, A.K.
4bf7653f-c115-4692-b3d7-cebe7dc6e706
Rufty, T.W.
474d5ab8-84de-44e1-8b83-3b912f1da4d1
Raymer, P.L.
0fa8b787-1c73-4d43-8fe6-8120966d94e7
Stewart, C.N.
ed3b6e73-62b7-4a21-a202-58b6277c8e7c

Halfhill, M.D., Sutherland, J.P., Moon, H.S., Poppy, G.M., Warwick, S.I., Weissinger, A.K., Rufty, T.W., Raymer, P.L. and Stewart, C.N. (2005) Growth, productivity, and competitiveness of introgressed weedy Brassica rapa hybrids selected for the presence of Bt cry1Ac and gfp transgenes. Molecular Ecology, 14 (10), 3177-3189. (doi:10.1111/j.1365-294X.2005.02649.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Concerns exist that transgenic crop × weed hybrid populations will be more vigorous and competitive with crops compared with the parental weed species. Hydroponic, glasshouse, and field experiments were performed to evaluate the effects of introgression of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) cry1Ac and green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenes on hybrid productivity and competitiveness in four experimental Brassica rapa × transgenic Brassica napus hybrid generations (F1, BC1F1, BC2F1 and BC2F2). The average vegetative growth and nitrogen (N) use efficiency of transgenic hybrid generations grown under high N hydroponic conditions were lower than that of the weed parent (Brassica rapa, AA, 2n = 20), but similar to the transgenic crop parent, oilseed rape (Brassica napus, AACC, 2n = 38). No generational differences were detected under low N conditions. In two noncompetitive glasshouse experiments, both transgenic and nontransgenic BC2F2 hybrids had on average less vegetative growth and seed production than B. rapa. In two high intraspecific competition field experiments with varied herbivore pressure, BC2F2 hybrids produced less vegetative dry weight than B. rapa. The competitive ability of transgenic and nontransgenic BC2F2 hybrids against a neighbouring crop species were quantified in competition experiments that assayed wheat (Triticum aestivum) yield reductions under agronomic field conditions. The hybrids were the least competitive with wheat compared with parental Brassica competitors, although differences between transgenic and nontransgenic hybrids varied with location. Hybridization, with or without transgene introgression, resulted in less productive and competitive populations.

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Published date: 1 September 2005
Keywords: Bacillus thuringiensis, Brassica napus, Brassica rapa, hybridization, insect resistance, introgression

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 55910
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/55910
ISSN: 0962-1083
PURE UUID: 776ef463-82f8-424b-81b7-4b26379a2730

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Date deposited: 06 Aug 2008
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 14:31

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Contributors

Author: M.D. Halfhill
Author: J.P. Sutherland
Author: H.S. Moon
Author: G.M. Poppy
Author: S.I. Warwick
Author: A.K. Weissinger
Author: T.W. Rufty
Author: P.L. Raymer
Author: C.N. Stewart

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