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Selection and acceptance of flavours in concentrate diets for stabled horses

Selection and acceptance of flavours in concentrate diets for stabled horses
Selection and acceptance of flavours in concentrate diets for stabled horses
Like most large grazing herbivores, horses select their food based on visual cues, odour, taste, texture, availability and variety. There is relatively little published information about the role of flavour in diet selection by domestic horses in comparison with other domestic and companion animals. However, previous trials investigating effects of diet flavour in stabled horses indicated significant effects on foraging behaviour and selection.
In this series of three trials we aimed to determine relative acceptance by presenting flavour preference tests to eight horses. Horses were stabled and fed hay ad lib on trial data collection days plus a standard unflavoured concentrate ration at 7:30 a.m.
In Trial 1, 15 flavours were separately presented in standard 100 g cereal by-product meals and the trial was replicated. Quantity consumed, time of completion, partial rejection or refusal were recorded. Order of presentation was determined by a Latin Square design. Trial data were collected on five sampling days, separated by a minimum of 1 day. Horses were presented with six flavoured meals daily; minimum 1 h between the meals. Twelve flavours were universally accepted and of these the eight flavours with fastest mean consumption times (banana, carrot, cherry, cumin, fenugreek, oregano, peppermint and rosemary) were presented in paired preference tests in Trial 2.
In Trial 2, all paired combinations of the eight flavours were presented, in two tests per day at noon and 4 p.m. Presentations of the same flavour were separated by at least 1 day. Paired presentations were in 300 g cereal by-product. Presentations were terminated when approximately half of the total amount presented had been consumed. Flavour preferences were expressed as a ratio from 0 (rejection) to 1 (exclusive consumption). Paired flavour preferences produced the following rank order: fenugreek, banana, cherry, rosemary, cumin, carrot, peppermint, oregano.
In Trial 3, relative consumption times of mineral pellets flavoured with fenugreek and banana were significantly reduced in comparison with unflavoured pellets.
In these short-term trials, flavour had significant effects on diet acceptance, selection and consumption times.
horse, flavour, diet, selection, acceptance
0168-1591
223-232
Goodwin, D.
44ea5b5f-3933-4171-83b6-8d48928e27ca
Davidson, H.P.B.
c94e24c3-37c7-4410-9961-03125268908c
Harris, P.
65908d3a-d64f-436d-829a-fd500923515b
Goodwin, D.
44ea5b5f-3933-4171-83b6-8d48928e27ca
Davidson, H.P.B.
c94e24c3-37c7-4410-9961-03125268908c
Harris, P.
65908d3a-d64f-436d-829a-fd500923515b

Goodwin, D., Davidson, H.P.B. and Harris, P. (2005) Selection and acceptance of flavours in concentrate diets for stabled horses. Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 95 (3-4), 223-232. (doi:10.1016/j.applanim.2005.04.007).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Like most large grazing herbivores, horses select their food based on visual cues, odour, taste, texture, availability and variety. There is relatively little published information about the role of flavour in diet selection by domestic horses in comparison with other domestic and companion animals. However, previous trials investigating effects of diet flavour in stabled horses indicated significant effects on foraging behaviour and selection.
In this series of three trials we aimed to determine relative acceptance by presenting flavour preference tests to eight horses. Horses were stabled and fed hay ad lib on trial data collection days plus a standard unflavoured concentrate ration at 7:30 a.m.
In Trial 1, 15 flavours were separately presented in standard 100 g cereal by-product meals and the trial was replicated. Quantity consumed, time of completion, partial rejection or refusal were recorded. Order of presentation was determined by a Latin Square design. Trial data were collected on five sampling days, separated by a minimum of 1 day. Horses were presented with six flavoured meals daily; minimum 1 h between the meals. Twelve flavours were universally accepted and of these the eight flavours with fastest mean consumption times (banana, carrot, cherry, cumin, fenugreek, oregano, peppermint and rosemary) were presented in paired preference tests in Trial 2.
In Trial 2, all paired combinations of the eight flavours were presented, in two tests per day at noon and 4 p.m. Presentations of the same flavour were separated by at least 1 day. Paired presentations were in 300 g cereal by-product. Presentations were terminated when approximately half of the total amount presented had been consumed. Flavour preferences were expressed as a ratio from 0 (rejection) to 1 (exclusive consumption). Paired flavour preferences produced the following rank order: fenugreek, banana, cherry, rosemary, cumin, carrot, peppermint, oregano.
In Trial 3, relative consumption times of mineral pellets flavoured with fenugreek and banana were significantly reduced in comparison with unflavoured pellets.
In these short-term trials, flavour had significant effects on diet acceptance, selection and consumption times.

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More information

Published date: 1 December 2005
Keywords: horse, flavour, diet, selection, acceptance

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 56206
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/56206
ISSN: 0168-1591
PURE UUID: b7fabcdc-0a57-45cd-9873-f7a96c47a769

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Aug 2008
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:35

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