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Micromagnetic simulation studies of ferromagnetic part spheres

Micromagnetic simulation studies of ferromagnetic part spheres
Micromagnetic simulation studies of ferromagnetic part spheres
Self-assembly techniques can be used to produce periodic arrays of magnetic nanostructures. We have developed a double-template technique using electrochemical deposition. This method produces arrays of dots which are of spherical shape, as opposed to those prepared by standard lithographic techniques, which are usually cylindrical. By varying the amount of material that is deposited electrochemically, spheres of diameter d can be grown up to varying heights h<d. Thus different spherical shapes can be created ranging from shallow dots to almost complete spheres. Using micromagnetic modeling, we calculate numerically the magnetization reversal of the soft part spherical particles. The observed reversal mechanisms range from single domain reversal at small radii to vortex movement in shallow systems at larger radii and vortex core reversal, as observed in spheres at larger heights. We present a phase diagram of the reversal behavior as a function of radius and growth height. Additionally, we compare simulation results of hybrid finite element/boundary element and finite difference calculations for the same systems.
0021-8979
10E305-[3pp]
Boardman, Richard P.
5818d677-5732-4e8a-a342-7164dbb10df1
Zimmermann, Jürgen
44cd9549-eef9-4199-9032-774471b6a4df
Fangohr, Hans
9b7cfab9-d5dc-45dc-947c-2eba5c81a160
Zhukov, Alexander A.
75d64070-ea67-4984-ae75-4d5798cd3c61
de Groot, Peter A.J.
bfa58a4b-32bf-4e34-8ee9-15d673d90bf6
Boardman, Richard P.
5818d677-5732-4e8a-a342-7164dbb10df1
Zimmermann, Jürgen
44cd9549-eef9-4199-9032-774471b6a4df
Fangohr, Hans
9b7cfab9-d5dc-45dc-947c-2eba5c81a160
Zhukov, Alexander A.
75d64070-ea67-4984-ae75-4d5798cd3c61
de Groot, Peter A.J.
bfa58a4b-32bf-4e34-8ee9-15d673d90bf6

Boardman, Richard P., Zimmermann, Jürgen, Fangohr, Hans, Zhukov, Alexander A. and de Groot, Peter A.J. (2005) Micromagnetic simulation studies of ferromagnetic part spheres. Journal of Applied Physics, 97 (10), 10E305-[3pp]. (doi:10.1063/1.1850073).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Self-assembly techniques can be used to produce periodic arrays of magnetic nanostructures. We have developed a double-template technique using electrochemical deposition. This method produces arrays of dots which are of spherical shape, as opposed to those prepared by standard lithographic techniques, which are usually cylindrical. By varying the amount of material that is deposited electrochemically, spheres of diameter d can be grown up to varying heights h<d. Thus different spherical shapes can be created ranging from shallow dots to almost complete spheres. Using micromagnetic modeling, we calculate numerically the magnetization reversal of the soft part spherical particles. The observed reversal mechanisms range from single domain reversal at small radii to vortex movement in shallow systems at larger radii and vortex core reversal, as observed in spheres at larger heights. We present a phase diagram of the reversal behavior as a function of radius and growth height. Additionally, we compare simulation results of hybrid finite element/boundary element and finite difference calculations for the same systems.

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Published date: 6 May 2005

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 57097
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/57097
ISSN: 0021-8979
PURE UUID: 52156c39-6af4-4082-b04b-50ead047ddbc

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Date deposited: 07 Aug 2008
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:34

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