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Epigeic Collembola in winter wheat under organic, integrated and conventional farm management regimes

Epigeic Collembola in winter wheat under organic, integrated and conventional farm management regimes
Epigeic Collembola in winter wheat under organic, integrated and conventional farm management regimes
Community characteristics of Collembola assemblages in conventional, integrated and organic fields of winter wheat were compared among three randomly chosen areas in England using analysis of similarities, cluster analysis, multi-dimensional scaling and several measures of diversity and evenness. Indicator values were used to identify indicator species. Significant differences were found in the abundance of most species and in community structure among the three geographical regions but few differences between the farming regimes were significant. Despite a lack of significant differences among regimes, Entomobrya multifasciata and Isotomurus spp. were consistently, although not significantly more common in conventional than organic fields whereas the opposite was true for Isotoma viridis and Isotoma notabilis. Farming regime significantly affected the abundance of Sminthurinus elegans and Sminthurus viridis but the effect differed between geographical regions. Community composition and species dominance were influenced by farming regime, but no species were indicative of the different farming systems, as most occurred ubiquitously in all fields. Organically and conventionally farmed fields were found not to differ significantly from each other in community composition, but both differed from integrated fields. These findings are compared with the results from other recent European studies of the effects of farming systems on arthropods and their wider ecological implications are discussed. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.
pesticide effects, farming system, arable, arthropods, United Kingdom
0167-8809
95-110
Alvarez, Tania
4e7e8687-5484-4f9a-9bf1-50dde832f825
Frampton, Geoff.K.
9ad178eb-78d7-4ca8-9caa-c8b2dfb7019b
Goulson, Dave
50da43d9-00ee-46c3-8107-fa8c67f7f4b5
Alvarez, Tania
4e7e8687-5484-4f9a-9bf1-50dde832f825
Frampton, Geoff.K.
9ad178eb-78d7-4ca8-9caa-c8b2dfb7019b
Goulson, Dave
50da43d9-00ee-46c3-8107-fa8c67f7f4b5

Alvarez, Tania, Frampton, Geoff.K. and Goulson, Dave (2001) Epigeic Collembola in winter wheat under organic, integrated and conventional farm management regimes. Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, 83 (1/2), 95-110. (doi:10.1016/S0167-8809(00)00195-X).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Community characteristics of Collembola assemblages in conventional, integrated and organic fields of winter wheat were compared among three randomly chosen areas in England using analysis of similarities, cluster analysis, multi-dimensional scaling and several measures of diversity and evenness. Indicator values were used to identify indicator species. Significant differences were found in the abundance of most species and in community structure among the three geographical regions but few differences between the farming regimes were significant. Despite a lack of significant differences among regimes, Entomobrya multifasciata and Isotomurus spp. were consistently, although not significantly more common in conventional than organic fields whereas the opposite was true for Isotoma viridis and Isotoma notabilis. Farming regime significantly affected the abundance of Sminthurinus elegans and Sminthurus viridis but the effect differed between geographical regions. Community composition and species dominance were influenced by farming regime, but no species were indicative of the different farming systems, as most occurred ubiquitously in all fields. Organically and conventionally farmed fields were found not to differ significantly from each other in community composition, but both differed from integrated fields. These findings are compared with the results from other recent European studies of the effects of farming systems on arthropods and their wider ecological implications are discussed. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

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More information

Submitted date: 17 May 1999
Published date: January 2001
Keywords: pesticide effects, farming system, arable, arthropods, United Kingdom

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 57704
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/57704
ISSN: 0167-8809
PURE UUID: 21c977c6-65c4-42e8-945b-c56d02fbbbc3

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Date deposited: 08 Aug 2008
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:33

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Contributors

Author: Tania Alvarez
Author: Geoff.K. Frampton
Author: Dave Goulson

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