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Investigation of the mechanisms of voicing offset (Invited Paper for Special Session on Speech Communication: Acoustics of Speech Production: Aeroacoustics and Phonation)

Investigation of the mechanisms of voicing offset (Invited Paper for Special Session on Speech Communication: Acoustics of Speech Production: Aeroacoustics and Phonation)
Investigation of the mechanisms of voicing offset (Invited Paper for Special Session on Speech Communication: Acoustics of Speech Production: Aeroacoustics and Phonation)
During voiced speech the source of sound production arises from the vibrations of the vocal folds within the larynx. In order to terminate these vibrations it is necessary either to adduct the vocal folds to produce a forced closure or to reduce the pressure drop across them to below a threshold level. A reduction in pressure drop might be achieved by reducing the sub-glottal pressure, by increasing the supra-glottal pressure or by abduction of the folds. Two human subjects were asked to achieve phonation offset by each of these strategies in turn. Acoustic and EGG signals measured on the subjects were compared with the output of a simple theoretical vocal fold model. A further comparison was made with corresponding signals recorded during the production of selected short phrases by a European Portuguese speaker; a language where devoicing of both vowels and voiced consonants is particularly prevalent.
0001-4966
3576
Barney, A.
bc0ee7f7-517a-4154-ab7d-57270de3e815
Jesus, L.
7f25a99e-0a61-4ece-9265-b8d696ebf520
Santos, R.
ba3b5c0e-8a8c-425b-b83b-5617a0f59e3f
Barney, A.
bc0ee7f7-517a-4154-ab7d-57270de3e815
Jesus, L.
7f25a99e-0a61-4ece-9265-b8d696ebf520
Santos, R.
ba3b5c0e-8a8c-425b-b83b-5617a0f59e3f

Barney, A., Jesus, L. and Santos, R. (2008) Investigation of the mechanisms of voicing offset (Invited Paper for Special Session on Speech Communication: Acoustics of Speech Production: Aeroacoustics and Phonation). Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 123 (5), 3576. (doi:10.1121/1.2934665).

Record type: Article

Abstract

During voiced speech the source of sound production arises from the vibrations of the vocal folds within the larynx. In order to terminate these vibrations it is necessary either to adduct the vocal folds to produce a forced closure or to reduce the pressure drop across them to below a threshold level. A reduction in pressure drop might be achieved by reducing the sub-glottal pressure, by increasing the supra-glottal pressure or by abduction of the folds. Two human subjects were asked to achieve phonation offset by each of these strategies in turn. Acoustic and EGG signals measured on the subjects were compared with the output of a simple theoretical vocal fold model. A further comparison was made with corresponding signals recorded during the production of selected short phrases by a European Portuguese speaker; a language where devoicing of both vowels and voiced consonants is particularly prevalent.

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Published date: May 2008

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 57807
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/57807
ISSN: 0001-4966
PURE UUID: 1eedccee-f548-4ae0-87f7-4e44cacdce84
ORCID for A. Barney: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6034-1478

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Date deposited: 21 Aug 2008
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:49

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