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Hypotheses regarding exploitation of bubble acoustics by cetaceans

Hypotheses regarding exploitation of bubble acoustics by cetaceans
Hypotheses regarding exploitation of bubble acoustics by cetaceans
Bubbles are the most acoustically active naturally occurring entities in the ocean, and cetaceans are the most intelligent. Having evolved over tens of millions of years to cope with the underwater acoustic environment, cetaceans may have developed extraordinary techniques from which we could learn. This paper outlines some of the possible interactions, ranging from the exploitation of acoustics by humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) in bubble nets to trap prey, to techniques by which coastal dolphins (e.g. of the genus Cephalorhynchus) could successfully echolocate in bubbly water (a hypothesis which has led to the development of a man-made sonar which can penetrate bubble clouds, and a range of possibilities for homeland security). ©2008 Acoustical Society of America

0001-4966
Leighton, Timothy G.
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae
White, Paul R.
2dd2477b-5aa9-42e2-9d19-0806d994eaba
Finfer, David C.
2bdc0add-1ff4-459a-af56-abeae1038fef
Leighton, Timothy G.
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae
White, Paul R.
2dd2477b-5aa9-42e2-9d19-0806d994eaba
Finfer, David C.
2bdc0add-1ff4-459a-af56-abeae1038fef

Leighton, Timothy G., White, Paul R. and Finfer, David C. (2008) Hypotheses regarding exploitation of bubble acoustics by cetaceans. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 123 (5). (doi:10.1121/1.2932973).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Bubbles are the most acoustically active naturally occurring entities in the ocean, and cetaceans are the most intelligent. Having evolved over tens of millions of years to cope with the underwater acoustic environment, cetaceans may have developed extraordinary techniques from which we could learn. This paper outlines some of the possible interactions, ranging from the exploitation of acoustics by humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) in bubble nets to trap prey, to techniques by which coastal dolphins (e.g. of the genus Cephalorhynchus) could successfully echolocate in bubbly water (a hypothesis which has led to the development of a man-made sonar which can penetrate bubble clouds, and a range of possibilities for homeland security). ©2008 Acoustical Society of America

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More information

Published date: May 2008

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 57843
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/57843
ISSN: 0001-4966
PURE UUID: c1a01b0c-6cf0-44bc-8e60-fc7cba9bcf20
ORCID for Timothy G. Leighton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1649-8750
ORCID for Paul R. White: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4787-8713

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Aug 2008
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:54

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