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Stress in UK families conducting intensive home-based behavioral intervention for their young child with autism

Stress in UK families conducting intensive home-based behavioral intervention for their young child with autism
Stress in UK families conducting intensive home-based behavioral intervention for their young child with autism
There is increasing international interest in intensive home-based behavioral intervention for children with autism. In the present study, 141 UK parents conducting such interventions completed a questionnaire addressing issues of stress, coping, and support. Regression analyses showed that parents'' stress levels were predicted mainly by psychological rather than demographic variables. In particular, adaptive coping strategies, informal social support sources, and beliefs about the efficacy of the intervention were associated with lower reported stress and higher levels of autism symptomatology were associated with higher reported stress. There was also evidence that the use of Passive Appraisal coping and beliefs about the efficacy of the interventions moderated the effects of autism symptomatology on parents'' pessimism. Implications of these findings for future research and for the support of families engaged in intensive home-based behavioral intervention are discussed.
applied behavior analysis, early intervention, parental stress, parental beliefs
0162-3257
327-336
Hastings, R.P.
7c2e6f17-c5e8-47bc-baff-137dd6ce9f9a
Johnson, E.
65348f67-aa84-465a-b726-d492a56ffd58
Hastings, R.P.
7c2e6f17-c5e8-47bc-baff-137dd6ce9f9a
Johnson, E.
65348f67-aa84-465a-b726-d492a56ffd58

Hastings, R.P. and Johnson, E. (2001) Stress in UK families conducting intensive home-based behavioral intervention for their young child with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 31 (3), 327-336. (doi:10.1023/A:1010799320795).

Record type: Article

Abstract

There is increasing international interest in intensive home-based behavioral intervention for children with autism. In the present study, 141 UK parents conducting such interventions completed a questionnaire addressing issues of stress, coping, and support. Regression analyses showed that parents'' stress levels were predicted mainly by psychological rather than demographic variables. In particular, adaptive coping strategies, informal social support sources, and beliefs about the efficacy of the intervention were associated with lower reported stress and higher levels of autism symptomatology were associated with higher reported stress. There was also evidence that the use of Passive Appraisal coping and beliefs about the efficacy of the interventions moderated the effects of autism symptomatology on parents'' pessimism. Implications of these findings for future research and for the support of families engaged in intensive home-based behavioral intervention are discussed.

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More information

Published date: 2001
Keywords: applied behavior analysis, early intervention, parental stress, parental beliefs

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 57956
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/57956
ISSN: 0162-3257
PURE UUID: 01da2c15-2187-42eb-bd81-6b8e2b37d4e0

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Date deposited: 11 Aug 2008
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:33

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