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Swedish and English adolescents' attitudes toward the community presence of people with disabilities

Swedish and English adolescents' attitudes toward the community presence of people with disabilities
Swedish and English adolescents' attitudes toward the community presence of people with disabilities
Predictions derived from North American formulations of normalization suggest that contemporary care policies for people with intellectual disabilities will have a positive impact on societal perceptions of this group. To test this, adolescents' attitudes towards the community presence of people with disabilities in a normalization-advanced country (Sweden) and a relatively less normalization-advanced country (England) were compared. It was expected that Swedish and English participants would hold equally positive views of people with a non-intellectual disability, whereas English participants would hold less positive views than Swedish participants of people with an intellectual disability. The results gave limited support to this expectation when dimensions of participants' attitudes derived from a factor analysis were analysed. These results are discussed with reference to other factors that may influence attitudes in the two countries. In addition, implications for future research and practice are outlined.
0964-2633
246-253
Hastings, R.P.
7c2e6f17-c5e8-47bc-baff-137dd6ce9f9a
Sjöström, K.E.
8edbd8a2-3eeb-4721-a9b8-326ff77aa2fb
Stevenage, S.V.
493f8c57-9af9-4783-b189-e06b8e958460
Hastings, R.P.
7c2e6f17-c5e8-47bc-baff-137dd6ce9f9a
Sjöström, K.E.
8edbd8a2-3eeb-4721-a9b8-326ff77aa2fb
Stevenage, S.V.
493f8c57-9af9-4783-b189-e06b8e958460

Hastings, R.P., Sjöström, K.E. and Stevenage, S.V. (1998) Swedish and English adolescents' attitudes toward the community presence of people with disabilities. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 42 (3), 246-253. (doi:10.1046/j.1365-2788.1998.00125.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Predictions derived from North American formulations of normalization suggest that contemporary care policies for people with intellectual disabilities will have a positive impact on societal perceptions of this group. To test this, adolescents' attitudes towards the community presence of people with disabilities in a normalization-advanced country (Sweden) and a relatively less normalization-advanced country (England) were compared. It was expected that Swedish and English participants would hold equally positive views of people with a non-intellectual disability, whereas English participants would hold less positive views than Swedish participants of people with an intellectual disability. The results gave limited support to this expectation when dimensions of participants' attitudes derived from a factor analysis were analysed. These results are discussed with reference to other factors that may influence attitudes in the two countries. In addition, implications for future research and practice are outlined.

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Published date: 1998

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 57966
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/57966
ISSN: 0964-2633
PURE UUID: 37e420c3-88ab-4902-adbe-0b3356d69b0f
ORCID for S.V. Stevenage: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4155-2939

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Date deposited: 18 Aug 2008
Last modified: 08 Jan 2022 02:40

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Contributors

Author: R.P. Hastings
Author: K.E. Sjöström
Author: S.V. Stevenage ORCID iD

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